Louis L’Amour probably stands next to Zane Grey as a writer of westerns. From his wiki intro:
Haunted Mesa

Louis Dearborn L’Amour (22 March 1908 – 10 June 1988) was an American author. His books consisted primarily of Western novels (though he called his work ‘frontier stories’), however he also wrote historical fiction (The Walking Drum), science fiction (The Haunted Mesa), nonfiction (Frontier), as well as poetry and short-story collections. Many of his stories were made into movies. L’Amour’s books remain popular and most have gone through multiple printings. At the time of his death some of his 105 existing works were in print (89 novels, 14 short-story collections, and two full-length works of nonfiction) and he was considered “one of the world’s most popular writers”.[1][2]

As I looked through the list of L’Amour’s works at Goodreads.com, I realized that I have not read many of his books although I have seen a number of regular and TV movies from L’Amours books. One L’Amour book I know I have read and enjoyed very much is The Haunted Mesa, a science-fiction (cross dimensional) story set in the southwest. From the wiki of the book:

The Haunted Mesa is a science fiction novel by Louis L’Amour, set in the American Southwest amidst the ruins of the Anasazi. L’Amour attempts, as in others of his works, to suggest a reasonable explanation for the phenomena attributed to The Bermuda Triangle, i.e., portals between worlds or different facets of this world.

Other L’Amour books I have read over the years are Sitka (set in Alaska) and High Lonesome.

As I said, I have seen more movies based on L’Amour’s work than I have read his actual books. Hondo with John Wayne, Utah Blaine with Rory Calhoun, and Heller in Pink Tights with Anthony Quinn. Sam Elliott has made a pretty good career out of Louis L’Amour books made into TV movies starring in The Sacketts, The Shadow Riders, The Quick and the Dead, and Conagher. Tom Selleck co-starred with Elliott in the first two and also starred in Crossfire Trail.

L’Amour wrote a novelization of the script for the epic western movie How the West Was Won.


Picture from Hadley Paul Garland licensed under Creative Commons