“This time there was a NO.” Hörður Torfason discusses how Iceland’s revolution is a road map for American systemic change.

Hörður Torfason recently spoke at the Rage Against The Regime event in Dublin, Ireland saying “They are misusing the power they were given, the price for their ego is us.”

1.  How do you create the environment to force a government to resign?

Hörður Torfason: We were there month after month, protesting. We started writing letters. … The leaders are arrogant and live in their own bubble. … It is always a matter of winning the trust of people. … People found this, “okay, okay there is something in it.” … People understood we were peaceful and we meant what we were saying. … It takes time but we have to prove ourselves. … It takes time to change society.

2.  What is the world perspective of the USA these days?

Hörður Torfason: It is not the American people, it is the government of America, the elite, the politicians. They are like becoming, I don’t know, the fascists. How in the world can they allow themselves to invade countries, time and time again, killing millions of people? Who gave them that right? Why can’t you respect other people’s opinion. Why can’t they let other people alone. There’s a reason. There is money in it.

Talking about 9-11 … With all respect for the people who lost their relatives and all the people who got killed there. … They make films about the feelings of relatives and how terrible and shocking it was to the Americans, but have we seen some similar documentaries about the people in Syria or wherever around the world where Americans invaded and destroyed the lives of millions? No. No. The politicians of America should be honest and look in the mirror, but I don’t think they dare to.

3.  As I have mentioned to you previously, those of us at ArticleV.org have a request for verification and tabulation of 42 state legislature applications for a constitutional convention as prescribed under article V of the US constitution before the judiciary committees of both houses. This is the first time in our nation’s history that Congress has been asked to provide us with an official count. If they determine 34 states have applied, 8 less than the 42 states they will initially review, a mandatory call for a convention to propose amendments will be created.

Should American’s fear this convention to propose amendments to the Constitution? What has your experience been?

Hörður Torfason: You have found a way to deal with it at the supreme capitol way. To me, I think this is fantastic, this is the way to do it. Then it is our duty, our job, us that think differently, to find a way to reason. … You mentioned slavery, like people think slavery will come back, but come on think of it. Huge part of humans are in slavery already just through the money system. They are enslaved for the rest of their lives. To me that is slavery. So we have to find good reasons and get people to understand that what we are trying to do is get our freedom back. It is to get more equality in life. … Just the idea of like changing the Constitution and changing and affecting the political system and everything, that’s the beauty of progress. We are not scared to change things. This is something I really support.

By the fifth article of the plan, the Congres will be obliged ‘on the application of the legislatures of two thirds of the States [which at present amount to nine], to call a convention for proposing amendments, which shall be valid, to all intents and purposes, as part of the Constitution, when ratified by the legislatures of three fourths of the States, or by conventions in three fourths thereof.’ The words of this article are peremptory. The Congress ‘shall call a convention.’ Nothing in this particular is left to the discretion of that body. And of consequence, all the declamation about the disinclination to a change vanishes in air. –The Federalist No. 85, Alexander Hamilton