Tim DeChristopher at a podium

Newly freed climate-justice activist Tim DeChristopher adds to a groundswell in the environmental movement.

Hundreds gathered in Dallas to reject the Bush Lie Bury, and three went to jail.  I flew from Dallas to Syracuse, where hundreds protested Obama’s drone-murder program, and 32 went to jail and are still there (and will stay until trial unless bail can be raised) — some of them risk major jail time because they violated a protective order that the commander of a U.S. military base gained to protect himself from nonviolent peace activists.  Another drone protester in Missouri, Brian Terrell, is just finishing a six-month sentence.  Climate activist Tim DeChristopher just got out.  The people locked in Guantanamo are refusing to eat, and groups around the world are making plans to fast with them.  The people of Vieques are rallying on May 1st to demand that the U.S. military truly depart their island.  Big plans are being made to rally for Bradley Manning on June 1st.  This week I’m heading to the National War Tax Resistance Coordinating Committee’s meeting in North Carolina, after which — just over in Tennessee — three courageous activists go on trial, facing major time in prison, for having entered and protested a nuclear weapons facility.

The revolution will not be televised.

Oak Ridge, Tenn., was created during World War II as a secret city (actually two, it was segregated by race) for producing nuclear weapons.  Nuclear weapons have a history that marches hand-in-hand with U.S. human experimentation programs.  I just had a chance to read Susan Griffin’s A Chorus of Stones, and she recounts a nuclear test in 1957, when the U.S. government was still marching Marines to various distances from nuclear explosions in Nevada to find out what would become of them.  Marines with their eyes closed saw the bones in their hands.  They died of leukemia years later, but not before speaking about what else they saw: 10 or 12 people in a stockade formed by chain link fence and barbed wire, their faces and hands deformed, their hair falling out, their skin peeling off. Or this: men on the ground in agony, the smell of burning flesh, blood running from mouth, ears, and nose, a man trying to tear away wires that had been attached to his head.

In the late 1960s, Oak Ridge Associated Universities did radiation experiments on cancer patients, children of military personnel.  NASA provided the funding, wanting to know how much radiation would produce nausea, in preparation for sending astronauts to the moon.  And, boy, having sent astronauts to the moon has sure allowed us to take care of poverty and illness and environmental destruction.  I don’t know how we’d survive at all if we hadn’t killed those children to send astronauts to the moon.

On July 28, 2012, Michael R. Walli (63), Megan Rice (82), and Greg Boertje-Obed (57) entered the Y-12 nuclear weapons plant in Oak Ridge undetected.  You can’t walk down the street without being filmed, but these three senior citizens were able to walk at night right up to a nuclear weapons facility.  They hung up banners that read “Transform Now Plowshares” and “Swords into Plowshares Spears into Pruning Hooks–Isaiah.”  They strung up red crime tape.  They hammered on the cornerstone of the newly built Highly-Enriched Uranium Manufacturing Facility (HEUMF), splashed human blood and left four spray-painted tags on the recent construction which read: “Woe to the empire of blood,” “The fruit of justice is peace,” “Work for peace not for war,” and “Plowshares please Isaiah.”  When finally confronted by guards, they offered the guards bread and roses.  They sang while forced to kneel for a long period of time.

“We come to the Y-12 facility because our very humanity rejects the designs of nuclearism, empire and war,” the activists said in a statement.  “Our faith in love and nonviolence encourages us to believe that our activity here is necessary; that we come to invite transformation, undo the past and present work of Y-12; disarm and end any further efforts to increase the Y-12 capacity for an economy and social structure based upon war-making and empire-building.”

Vigils and other events are planned in Knoxville as the trial begins.

While the revolution is not televised, there is a calendar of events: http://warisacrime.org/content/upcoming-events

Photo by Linh Do released under a Creative Commons license.