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Armistice Day in the M.I.C.

4:54 pm in Uncategorized by David Swanson

Remarks at the Mt. Diablo Peace and Justice Center on November 10, 2012.

Thank you to Sergio for inviting me and helping set up this little trip I’m on.

Before I forget, tomorrow is Armistice Day, so we’ll be celebrating by dying in front of Senator Feinstein’s house at 10 a.m. at Vallejo & Lyon Streets before walking across the Golden Gate Bridge.  Please come.  And at 1:30 Medea Benjamin and Cindy Sheehan and I will be speaking on the question of whether U.S. wars are legal at the main public library in San Francisco.  We can talk about that question today, if you want, but I won’t make it the main focus of my opening remarks.

Ninety-four years ago tomorrow on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, fighting ceased in the “war to end all wars.” Thirty million soldiers had been killed or wounded and another seven million had been taken captive during World War I.  Never before had people witnessed such industrialized slaughter, with tens of thousands falling in a day to machine guns and poison gas.  After the war, more and more truth began to overtake the lies, but whether people still believed or now resented the pro-war propaganda, virtually every person in the United States wanted to see no more of war ever again.  Posters of Jesus shooting at Germans were left behind as the churches along with everyone else now said that war was wrong.  Al Jolson wrote in 1920 to President Harding:

“The weary world is waiting for

Peace forevermore

So take away the gun

From every mother’s son

And put an end to war.”

Congress passed an Armistice Day resolution calling for “exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding … inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples.” Later, Congress added that November 11th was to be “a day dedicated to the cause of world peace.”

While the ending of warfare was celebrated every November 11th, veterans were treated no better than they are today.  When 17,000 veterans plus their families and friends marched on Washington in 1932 to demand their bonuses, Douglas MacArthur, George Patton, Dwight Eisenhower, and other heroes of the next big war to come attacked the veterans, including by engaging in that greatest of evils with which Saddam Hussein would be endlessly charged: “using chemical weapons on their own people.”  The weapons they used, just like Hussein’s, originated in the U.S. of A.

It was only after another war, an even worse war, a war that has in many ways never ended to this day, that Congress, following still another now forgotten war — this one on Korea — changed the name of Armistice Day to Veterans Day on June 1, 1954.  And it was six-and-a-half years later that Eisenhower warned us that the military industrial complex would completely corrupt our society.  Veterans Day is no longer, for most people, a day to cheer the elimination of war or even to aspire to its abolition.  Veterans Day is not even a day on which to mourn or to question why suicide is the top killer of U.S. troops or why so many veterans have no houses at all in a nation in which one high-tech robber baron monopolist is hoarding $66 billion, and 400 of his closest friends have more money than half the country.  It’s not even a day to honestly, if sadistically, celebrate the fact that virtually all the victims of U.S. wars are non-Americans, that our so-called wars have become one-sided slaughters.  Instead, it is a day on which to believe that war is beautiful and good.  Towns and cities and corporations and sports leagues call it “military appreciation day” or “troop appreciation week” or “genocide glorification month.”  OK, I made up that last one.  Just checking if you’re paying attention.

This year, Veterans For Peace is celebrating Armistice Day in over 50 cities, including by ringing bells at 11 a.m. tomorrow.  Up in Auburn, Washington, however, Veterans For Peace Chapter 92 was been banned from marching in the Veterans Day Parade today.  Auburn said that other applicants more closely met the parade’s goals and purpose.  Among the applicants accepted were a motorcycle club, a Corvette club, the Optimists and Kiwanis International, the Sons of Italy, and a Daffodil Festival float.  Veterans For Peace was too off-topic.  But VFP and the ACLU sued and won, so Vets For Peace 92 is marching.

Veterans For Peace president Leah Bolger had remarked: “Look at the choice that Auburn is setting up for people who have seen war for themselves.  Either play along with the deadly lie that war is good and glorious, or be banished from the community and excluded from public events. Imagine the position that puts people in who know that, as Ben Franklin said, there has never been a good war or a bad peace. We should honor their courage in saying so, not deny them First Amendment rights that our highest courts now tell us even corporations can claim!”

On the original Armistice Day in 1918, much of the world ended a four-year war that served no useful purpose whatsoever while costing the lives of some 10 million soldiers, 6 million civilians, 21 million soldiers wounded, an outbreak of Spanish influenza that took another 100 million lives, environmental destruction that is ongoing today, the development of new weapons—including chemical weapons—still used today, huge leaps forward in the art of propaganda still plagiarized today, huge setbacks in the struggle for economic justice, and a culture more militarized, more focused on stupid ideas like banning alcohol, and more ready to restrict civil liberties in the name of nationalism, and all for the bargain price, as one author calculated it at the time, of enough money to have given a $2,500 home with $1,000 worth of furniture and five acres of land to every family in Russia, most of the European nations, Canada, the United States, and Australia, plus enough to give every city of over 20,000 a $2 million library, a $3 million hospital, a $20 million college, and still enough left over to buy every piece of property in Germany and Belgium.  And it was all legal.  Incredibly stupid, but totally legal.  Particular atrocities violated laws, but war was not criminal.  It never had been, but it soon would be.

One of the soldiers who died in World War I was a young British man named Wilfred Owen.  Ninety-four years ago last Sunday he was shot and killed.  The news of his death reached his parents home in England as the Armistice bells were ringing 94 years ago tomorrow.  When the war had begun, many fools were fond of quoting an old Latin saying: dulce et decorum est pro patria mori, meaning, “it is sweet and right to die for your country.”  During the war, Owen wrote a poem about how sweet and right it was to suffer from poison gas for no apparent purpose.  I’m sure you’ve heard it, but I think it could be well directed to most U.S. corporate media outlets in business today, so if you don’t mind, it went like this:
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Veterans Plan Armistice Day Events in Over 50 U.S. Cities

10:38 am in Uncategorized by David Swanson

Veterans for Peace chapters across the nation are meeting in major cities to celebrate the original Armistice Day as was done at the end of World War I, when the world came together in realization that war is so horrible we must end it now.

Fighting ceased in the “war to end all wars” on the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918. Thirty million soldiers had been killed or wounded and another seven million had been taken captive during World War I. Never before had people witnessed such industrialized slaughter. Congress responded to a universal hope among Americans for no more wars by passing a resolution calling for “exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding … inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples.” Later, Congress added that November 11th was to be “a day dedicated to the cause of world peace.”

On June 1, 1954, Congress changed the name of Armistice Day to Veterans Day.  This year, on November 11th, Veterans For Peace chapters and their allies all over the country intend to restore the tradition of Armistice Day.
And so it will be, with events planned in over 50 cities, many of them including the ringing of 11 bells at the 11th hour on November 11th.  In some cities, Veterans For Peace is partnering with MoveToAmend.org to advance the cause of removing money from politics — understanding such corruption to be a major driving force behind wars.  In some cities, groups will be striving to revive awareness of the Kellogg-Briand Pact which grew out of the antiwar sentiments after the Great War and which bars our nation and over 80 others from “recourse to war for the solution of international controversies.”

Events are planned in Bangor, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, Albany, Santa Cruz, Houston, Tuscon, Gainesville, Tallahassee, Washington DC, Northern N.J., Southern Wisc., Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Miami, New York, Cape Cod, Columbia Mo., Santa Barbara, Southern N.H., Wyoming, Oregon, Nashville, Broome County, San Diego, Seattle, Southeast Ark., Evansville, Orange County Calif., Sheboygan, Red Wing, Tampa, Potsdam, Atlanta, Buffalo, Pueblo, Tacoma, St. Augustine, Bandon, Fairbanks, Memphis, North Carolina triangle, Lane County, Iowa City, East Bay, Mansanita, Berks County, Linn County, Wenatchee Valley, Berkeley, Harrisonburg Va., Charlottesville, Va., St. Louis, San Jose, Marin County, Walnut Creek, and San Francisco.

In Minneapolis,
VFP and many allies will hold a ceremony at the First Shot Memorial on Minnesota’s Capitol grounds at 11 a.m. on the 11th.

In St. Louis, churches will ring their bells at 11 a.m. on the 11th.  Drummers will play at 11 a.m. in Keiner Plaza.

In Iowa City, bells will be rung at 11 a.m. on the 11th at the Clinton Street entrance to Old Capitol on the Pentacrest.

In Chicago, VFP, VVAW, and I/AVAW will hold a ceremony at 11 a.m. on the 11th at Wabash Avenue at Wacker Drive along the river.

In Boston, VFP will lead a parade, gathering at noon in Boston Commons, at the corner of Beacon and Charles Streets.  The parade kicks off at 1 p.m. and leads to a rally and music at Faneuill Hall – Sam Adams Park from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.

In St. Augustine, Fla., the city is expected to issue an official proclamation designating November 11th Veterans/Armistice Day and encouraging churches in the area to ring their church bells at 11:00 a.m. on November 11th inorder to reconsider the original intent of a public recognition of November 11th to honor peace and encourage their congregations to denounce war as a means of settling differences.

In Charlottesville, Va., VFP is co-sponsoring and co-organizing a display of Eyes Wide Open, the acclaimed “cost-of-war” display of hundreds of pairs of boots representing US service members from the area that were killed in ongoing occupations of the Near East.  The project will be staffed for three days, in downtown Charlottesville, at the University of Virginia, and at Immaculate Conception church.  In the spirit of Armistice Day, bells will be rung in conjunction on November 11th.

In Harrisonburg, Va.
, VFP plans a parade contingent for the Harrisonburg Veterans Day Parade.  They will also be co-hosting and co-sponsoring the Eyes Wide Open project on Monday, November 12th, at Eastern Mennonite University.

Five Related Events in the Bay Area, November 10-11, 2012:

November 10, 2:00 p.m., Walnut Creek
David Swanson
Mt. Diablo Peace Center, 55 Eckley Lane, Walnut Creek, CA 94596 – (925) 933-7850http://mtdpc.org
Free and open to the public.

Drone Warfare Protest and Golden Gate Bridge March
Sunday, November 11, 10 a.m. Die-in at Senator Dianne Feinstein’s mansion in Pacific Heights (Vallejo & Lyon Street) then caravan to monthly march across the Golden Gate Bridge. Noon: March begins!

Armistice Day
Sunday, November 11, 11 a.m.
Corner of Fourth & Santa Clara Street
San Jose, CA
Veterans for Peace chapters across the nation are meeting on street corners in major cities to celebrate the original ARMISTICE DAY by ringing bells 11 times at 11:00 on November 11 as as was done at the end of World War I, when the world came together in realization that war is so horrible we must end it now. Veterans for Peace Chapter 101 invites those with a personal or organizational commitment to peace to join us in the ringing of bells on the morning of November 11 to focus on the desire to end the horror of war rather than celebrate it. This event is co-sponsored by the San Jose Peace and Justice Center, Woman’s International League for Peace and Freedom, Code Pink, Move to Amend.

Sunday, November 11, 1:30-4:30 p.m. San Francisco
Medea Benjamin, Cindy Sheehan, and David Swanson
On the traditional Armistice Day, the War and Law League (WALL),
http://warandlaw.org, presents a forum on the theme, “U.S. Wars — Are They Lawful?” Admission is free. The forum, highlighting WALL’s biennial general meeting, is endorsed by the S.F. American Friends Service Committee and East Bay Peace Action. Main Public Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin Street at Grove Street, San Francisco, CA, near Civic Center BART/Muni station.

November 11, 7:00 p.m. Marin County
Medea Benjamin and David Swanson
“Stopping War: The Next One?  Forever? — An Armistice Day Instead of Veterans Day Event”
Sponsor: Marin Peace & Justice Coalition.  Co-sponsors: Social Justice Center of Marin and Community Media Center of Marin.
Olney Hall, College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield, CA
Admission $10 (No one turned away for lack of funds).

About the speakers at these events:

David Swanson will sign books including “When the World Outlawed War.” Swanson blogs at http://davidswanson.org and http://warisacrime.org and works as Campaign Coordinator for the online activist organization http://rootsaction.org. He hosts Talk Nation Radio.

Medea Benjamin is Co-Founder of Code Pink and Global Exchange and author of “Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control.”

Cindy Sheehan is a gold star mother, peace activist, host of Cindy Sheehan’s Soapbox, and author of “Revolution: A Love Story.”

Veterans For Peace was founded in 1985 and has approximately 5,000 members in 150 chapters located in every U.S. state and several countries.  It is a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization recognized as a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) by the United Nations, and is the only national veterans’ organization calling for the abolishment of war.

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