Should soon-to-be-ex-Gov. Sarah Palin’s attorney, Thomas van Flein actually go ahead and sue Alaska blogger Shannyn Moore, or any of the rest of the Alaska bloggers or citizen activists for "malicious" whatever, one of the very likely consequences would be a deposition or depositions of the ex-Gov.

An easy target might be all the lies she has told over the past two weeks. Were any of them or all of them "malicious?"

Is it malicious for her and Lt. Gov. Sean Parnell to inaccurately claim that citizens’ requests for clarification of interpretations of our executive ethics statutes have cost the state "millions," when that appears to be not just wildly inaccurate, but intentionally false?

Is it malicious for her to claim Alaska Natives on the lower Yukon have obtained 50% of their subsistence needs at a time when passing on that lie might hurt these peoples’ ability to have honest efforts directed their way before the short summer there is past?

Was it malicious for Palin to assert that she had made a pact with the Secret Service that didn’t exist?

Was it malicious for Palin to lie to the McCain campaign – repeatedly – about her husband’s level of involvement in the Alaska Independence Party?

In all these instances, either uttered, twittered or uncovered during the past week, it appears to me, Palin was, to borrow from van Flein’s July 4th statement, false, defamatory, and perhaps unscrupulous.

Should Palin sit in on a deposition for me, my attorney might ponder (courtesy of Andrew Sullivan):

Palin lied when she said the dismissal of her public safety commissioner, Walt Monegan, had nothing to do with his refusal to fire state trooper Mike Wooten; in fact, the Branchflower Report concluded that she repeatedly abused her power when dealing with both men.

Palin lied when she repeatedly claimed to have said, "Thanks, but no thanks" to the Bridge to Nowhere; in fact, she openly campaigned for the federal project when running for governor.

Palin lied when she denied that Wasilla’s police chief and librarian had been fired; in fact, both were given letters of termination the previous day.

Palin lied when she wrote in the NYT that a comprehensive review by Alaska wildlife officials showed that polar bears were not endangered; in fact, email correspondence between those scientists showed the opposite.

Palin lied when she claimed in her convention speech that an oil pipeline "began" under her guidance; in fact, the pipeline was years from breaking ground, if at all.

Palin lied when she told Charlie Gibson that she does not pass judgment on gay people; in fact, she opposes all rights between gay spouses and belongs to a church that promotes conversion therapy.

Palin lied when she denied having said that humans do not contribute to climate change; in fact, she had previously proclaimed that human activity was not to blame.

Palin lied when she claimed that Alaska produces 20 percent of the country’s domestic energy supply; in fact, the actual figures, based on any interpretation of her words, are much, much lower.

Palin lied when she told voters she improvised her convention speech when her teleprompter stopped working properly; in fact, all reports showed that the machine had functioned perfectly and that her speech had closely followed the script.

Palin lied when she recalled asking her daughters to vote on whether she should accept the VP offer; in fact, her story contradicts details given by her husband, the McCain campaign, and even Palin herself. (She later added another version.)

Palin lied when she claimed to have taken a voluntary pay cut as mayor; in fact, as councilmember she had voted against a raise for the mayor, but subsequent raises had taken effect by the time she was mayor.

Palin lied when she insisted that Wooten’s divorce proceedings had caused his confidential records to become public; in fact, court officials confirmed they released no such records.

Palin lied when she suggested to Katie Couric that she was involved in trade missions with Russia; in fact, she has never even met with Russian officials.

Palin lied when she told Shimon Peres that the only flag in her office was the Israeli flag; in fact, she has several flags.

Palin lied when she claimed to have tried to divest government funds from Sudan; in fact, her administration openly opposed a bill that would have done just that.

Palin lied when she repeatedly claimed that troop levels in Iraq were back to pre-surge levels; in fact, even she acknowledged her "misstatements," though she refused to retract or apologize.

Palin lied when she insisted that the Branchflower Report "showed there was no unlawful or unethical activity on my part"; in fact, that report prominently stated, "Palin abused her power by violating Alaska Statute 39.52.110(a) of the Alaska Executive Branch Ethics Act."

Palin lied when she claimed to have voiced concerns over Wooten fearing he would harm her family; in fact, she actually decreased her security detail during that period.

Andrew Sullivan goes on to list 14 more lies of major whopper size Palin has spewed. And – no doubt – he missed a few.

What questions would you have Palin asked if YOU could have her deposed?