To this day I remember answering the question in grade school “How do snowflakes form?” I confidently asserted it all starts with a piece of dust – and my teacher said I was wrong!! I.was.not., my daddy taught me all about it. He commiserated with me that night at dinner, telling us how he got into quite a fight with the nun about streamlining when he was in school, he too was right. We each grumbled and never forgot *pout*. The video below talks about the variations in a snowflake’s formation due to altitude and temperature and the vagaries of its fall to earth.

We’re about to get dumped on here – again, we already have a snow cover (wonder if it will last until Christmas?). Sadly, nowadays although I love the beauty and the quiet of snow, all I can think about when I hear it’s going to snow is broken wrists or cracked crowns.

Growing up, we lived on top of a small hill, back then there wasn’t much traffic so we could sled right down the hill – of course we had strategically placed spotters to make sure we didn’t get run over. Later we moved back to the yards. Saucers, toboggans, sleds, snowmobiles – all fun, even if the latter is loud. My flexible flyer is still hanging in the garage. Never a skier though, you?

I used to love cutting snowflakes as a kid, and I still make them to trim packages. The accomplished ReadsInTrees has a guide at instructables on how to do it right, have to have six arms or it’s a fraudulent flake. Sometimes I glitter them, or dot them up with crystally fabric/3D paints. You can do it virtually, perfect every time and no scraps – and it’s from Ze Frank.

And some science fun for the kids, make cool snowflake suncatchers that won’t melt, you just need a little 20 Mule Team to get it done.

For the ambitious, here’s Alexey Kljatov’s guide to photographing your own snowflakes.

Share your snow stories — and the hot cocoa, want a candy cane for stirring?

Photo by Alexey Kljatov, used under Creative Commons license