Are Huffpost columnists required to make a crack by paragraph two that alienates anyone except hard-core MSNBC Democrats? Actually, after its second paragraph, Robert Koehler’s “A Shortage of Mercy” is a good Huffpost column.The problem is paragraph two, in particular the highlighted (by me) section:

As the economy twists downward for most of us — as the politics of money tightens like a noose around everything we love — I think about the disintegration of human values, which insane logic and the Republicans tells us we can no longer afford.

So I respond in (something like) the following comment, which is then censored:

Mr. Koehler, nothing you write has anything to do with “the Republicans” and everything with the bipartisan neoliberal pro-austerity, anti-social-safety-net consensus. Your argument is completely voided when you make it clear in paragraph two that your ‘solution’ is to elect more of one of neoliberal austerity parties.

Koehler’s next paragraph goes like this:

A few days ago, Paul Buchheit wrote on Common Dreams about the poisonous nature of the ongoing privatization process: the inexorable corporate takeover of the human commons. As markets expand, the public domain — physical, social, spiritual — shrinks. It’s not simply that public land is auctioned off or that water rights are taken away from us, but that our right to care for others, to organize society around a modicum of compassion, is being confiscated in the name of “sorry, can’t afford it.”

What the hell does that have to do with making this a fake partisan issue? The corporate Democratic party led by President Obama can’t be any more pro-privatization. And by letting him and his corrupted cabal off the hook you let him cut cut cut away at all the good programs you supposedly are writing the column to defend. But of course you’ll whine, he can’t be as bad as “the Republicans,” who are in favor of “the disintegration of human values.” Maybe not, but both parties are fighting for shortages in mercy and everything else that costs the rich money.

In America’s feeble post-democratic and heavily censored discussion space, Huffpost is not worth the time. I’ll stick to commenting under Yahoo! articles. No censorship there and a lot more readers.