Wanna keep Social Security safe from the grubby paws of those oh-so-respectable stewards of an insolvent banking system? You know the ones: the desperate cowards who penned an open letter to American elected representatives the other day, begging “seriousness” in ongoing debate over how best Congress might piss on the U.S. Constitution in dealing with the so-called “budget deficit.”

(When this crew wasn’t so starved for capital needed to feed the collapsing Ponzi scheme which they, in fact, created, such communications were kept in private. But now, these have no choice but scream like little school girls in their pathetic appeal seeking a bigger siphon off the U.S. Treasury! In other words, you don’t have to believe me when I say the U.S. banking system is insolvent. America’s soon-to-be-jailed swindlers have said so loud and clear!)

There you have it! The first step necessary for saving Social Security: speak the truth. Shove it in your congressional representative’s face, again and again and again. Be relentless. The burden of proof now is on them. After all, the so-called “captains of finance” have openly admitted their situation is desperate with their insistence that Congress cut, cut, cut, this that all matters involving valuations assigned by “the market” to their marked-to-fantasy holdings not devolve into chaos.

Well, I have got bad news for these hacks. Chaotic collapse is inescapable! You cannot dismantle and ship overseas a once-productive, export-oriented economy, then pile on a huge mountain of debt and expect this debt to be sustained indefinitely. Have I not accurately described the past forty years of U.S. economic history? SHOVE IT IN THEIR FACE.

And when your rep whimpers, “Well, what can I do about it?,” turn it up a notch and insist they co-sponsor H.R. 1489 – Return to Prudent Banking Act of 2011 (Glass-Steagall), or start looking for another job.

Only when the United States comes to terms with the insolvency of its banking system will Social Security, in fact, be protected. Be aware, though, Glass-Steagall is but a beginning, and not an end. Yet it is a most critical shift, nonetheless, as this legislation represents the very principle defined in the U.S. Constitution’s Preamble made policy. Truth is only policies promoting such very essential principles as these, alone, can guarantee Social Security’s posterity.