It’s Cartoon Friday again!

Skeletal singer from Hasta Los HuesosAnd once again, MyFDL’s mafr suggested this great animation — it’s nice to have more cartoon fans participating. Thanks!

This film, entitled “Hasta Los Huesos” (roughly translated as “Down to the Bone”) is from 2002. On IMDB, José Luis Rivera Mendoza offers the following information:

Through the history of Mexican cinema, animated films never had a really strong presence until the decade of the 80s, when the relative success of José Luis Moro’s ‘Katy’ (a co-production with Spain) renewed the interest in animated films. Granted, there had been many attempts of making animation before, but there was never a real tradition of animated films in the Mexican film industry. Still, the country’s many economical troubles stopped the development of animation once again until the 90s when the films by Carlos Carrera (‘El Héroe’) and the team of René Castillo and Antonio Urrutia (‘Sin Sostén’) proved that there was still talented animators in Mexico working independently. The 21st century has brought once again a renewed interest in Mexican animation, with many new films done in its first decade. Castillo’s second film, ‘Hasta Los Huesos,’ it’s among the best of this new generation.

Known in English as ‘Down to the Bone’ (although it’s not an exact translation), ‘Hasta Los Huesos’ was written by director René Castillo himself, who inspired by the Mexican tradition of Day of the Dead. … Like in his previous film, Castillo uses a lighthearted tone of comedy to deal with this dark and melancholic subject, and once again he succeeds in creating a charming bittersweet fable that culminates in a fantastic use of the haunting traditional Mexican song titled “La Llorona” (‘The Crying Woman’). … [T]he plot unfolds nicely, and without dialog (other than the song lyrics), Castillo manages to tell more with images than with words.

As forms of animation go, claymation hasn’t always gotten the respect it deserves — maybe the bad taste left in our collective mouths by the California Raisins. Yet this 12-minute film shows its potential, from the expressive characters, amazing details like moving hair, to the incredible “boa snake.” To make “Hasta Los Huesos” even more satisfying, it features music by the talented Café Tacuba.

What are some of your favorite cartoons? I might use one for a future installment.

 

As some general reminders,

  • Please review our About Us page if you need a refresher on site rules,
  • we encourage you to use our flag system — if you see an abusive comment, user or post, please flag it rather than replying. We review every flag and take the best action available to us but …
  • the Firedoglake editors and staff are not allowed to comment on any moderation decisions.

This is our latest MyFDL open thread. You can chat about anything in the comments below if you are logged in.