• Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 18:27:43View | Delete

    What’s your twitter ID? I’m janehamsher. And if you’re ever in the DC area, it would definitely be great to meet! Thank you so much for being here today and sharing the film. I highly recommend it and hope everyone can see it.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 18:25:47View | Delete

    Right now, the film is available on Hulu, Amazon and Vimeo.

    That’s fantastic. How long has it been available there, and do you know how it has been doing? Do you have a link to the Facebook page so people can follow the conversation?

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 18:17:52View | Delete

    What is next for this film? I know it showed at the Arab Film Festival over the weekend, and has upcoming screenings in San Diego and Los Angeles. Are there other places people can see the film?

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 18:08:39View | Delete

    Do you have any plans to revisit similar subject matter in the future? Has making this film inspired you to delve deeper into IP issues, or are you pursuing other subjects now?

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 18:07:04View | Delete

    It pushes aside the context of occupation or lack of independence and focus solely on that. I always found that so interesting.

    I think it’s because you see how beautiful the city is and how much money they are capable of putting behind ethnic cleansing that it almost seems a foregone conclusion they will succeed. But I don’t think that makes the other things — destroying the fishing industry, denying building permits and decent jobs to Arabs, etc — any the less reprehensible. It just seems like people who are capable of standing up to the latter may not be able to resist the former. If Akka were an ugly squalid city the story might be very different.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:57:38View | Delete

    The nervousness came from showing the finished film. Everyone’s so afraid to speak out and call a bully a bully, and we got caught up in that tension.

    Having had to mediate IP flame wars even here, I can well imagine that is…an understatement.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:56:10View | Delete

    Max is a long time friend of FDL. You should totally get it to him. And Rhania Kalek too.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:54:05View | Delete

    The Arabs we spoke with were both Muslim and Christian. They didn’t want to differentiate themselves that way.

    I thought it was interesting that you opened the film saying that there were equal number of mosques and churches in the city.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:47:41View | Delete

    It’s true. And we were scared. And nervous. And we had to listen to a lot of generally smart, educated people say a lot of racist and stupid things. All coming from a place of great fear.

    Was that something you experienced during the making of the film, or was it more a part of the response to the finished film? I was wondering if you were ever scared when you were filming. If so I didn’t get that sense watching it.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:38:46View | Delete

    We went from thinking it was going to be one kind of film (focusing on maybe 3 families and their plight)

    Ah, was one of the families the teacher and the two young women? I noticed they had the same last name and wondered how they came to be in the film.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:37:35View | Delete

    But I think after this terrible summer, opinion is finally shifting and people are more open to a more humanizing view of the Palestinians.

    I was thinking when I saw it that your timing was good. If you’d released the same film even3 or 4 years ago, you’d still be scraping off the flame retardant. The conversation has become a lot more open. There’s a lot more leeway in what you can say.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:35:16View | Delete

    We had some rightwing, pro-Israel viewers who said “I’m glad I heard what they have to say. I don’t fully agree, but I heard it.” That made it worthwhile.

    I’d say that is what separates art with a point of view from abject propaganda. I am quickly bored with films that parrot back my own perspective with the assumption that everyone should share it. It’s the humanity of the piece that is moving, and if you have people who don’t agree with the perspective still being open to hearing what is being said, that is a mark of success.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:28:44View | Delete

    I also wanted to say that it was HARD to get the film shown in the states.

    That’s really sad. Because it’s a very good film and if you made it about any other place on earth, film festivals would really embrace it.

    But people always wanted to know why we didn’t include the Israeli side of the story, and the answer is because that side is always heard. Loud and clear.

    Well, it’s a film about the historical Palestinian population of Akka, not the Israelis. It’s like demanding that climate change deniers always have to be heard in any discussion about global warming because “there’s two sides to every story.” No, sometimes your story is just your story. The PC police shouldn’t have the job of story editors.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:24:22View | Delete

    So much of what’s out there is so real and painful to see. That’s important, but we wanted to take another approach and get people who ordinarily wouldn’t listen to take 75 minutes and hear what was being said.

    I think it’s really successful on that level. So many films that are out there are preaching to the converted, regardless of the perspective. This would definitely be a film I would recommend to someone who didn’t know about the situation but had an open mind. It doesn’t demand that you come in with a lot of pre-knowledge, or a particular perspective, in order to appreciate it. I really liked that about it. Yet it was respectful of the audience and didn’t pander.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:21:46View | Delete

    When the film ended I was hopeful because the people they interviewed were so great you were just uplifted by their spirit. But after that wore off I had to shake my head and wonder that they had lasted as long as they had. The place is really beautiful and with so much money to “gentrify” it (or ethnic cleansing if you prefer) it just doesn’t seem like anyone can hold out forever. Historically speaking that seems to be what happens anyway.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:17:42View | Delete

    Can you tell us if there are other films that have thematic similarities that you were influenced by when you were making this?

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:15:56View | Delete

    Well, it probably helps to be 10 years old.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:12:43View | Delete

    Good question ;)

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:10:39View | Delete

    Professor Doumani was great. He really anchors the film. Did you have him in mind when you started, or did you come across him in your research? I can imagine the structure of the film really emerged when you started cutting his interview.

  • Jane Hamsher commented on the blog post FDL Movie Night: It’s Better to Jump

    2014-10-20 17:09:33View | Delete

    I’m also curious to know how the response to the film has been. Taking on the IP situation has notoriously meant putting on the Hazmat suit. Do you feel like the film has received a fair response, or has it been split based on where people stand on IP issues? I imagine you’ve taken your share of flaming, even though I wouldn’t call the film a heavily didactic one.

  • Load More