Acharn

Last active
3 weeks, 4 days ago
  • Acharn commented on the blog post The Roundup for August 22nd, 2014

    2014-08-23 22:14:17View | Delete

    Oh, no, if you fund the schools that will just give money to teachers (bad) and then they’ll give it to the, you know, unions (very bad) and then they’ll spend lots of money for Democratic politicians (very, very bad) so that would be an awful idea. /snark

  • How about “manager,” as in Scott Walker, manager of the Koch Industries subsidiary formerly known as Wisconsin?

  • Acharn commented on the diary post Judith Miller, Operative and Proud of It by Phoenix Woman.

    2014-06-23 06:18:29View | Delete

    Bad enough that all these lying neocon fanatics are crawling out from under their rocks again, I hate the lamestream media for acting as if this is the most natural thing in the world, the obvious people to turn to for advice are the people who created the situation in the first place, and everybody [...]

  • Acharn commented on the diary post Everybody’s Got Afghanistan Wrong by David Swanson.

    2014-05-12 08:24:39View | Delete

    I don’t know who this “we” is of whom you speak, who wasn’t told all those things. I was told all of them and understood them clearly from October 2001 up through the end of the Bush years when the Democrats started trying to hush every body up because now it was their golden boy’s [...]

  • Acharn commented on the diary post Get Away with Theft and Terrorism: Be a White Male Conservative! by Phoenix Woman.

    2014-05-04 05:28:23View | Delete

    I really recommend reading Jack London’s “The Iron Heel.” The book is really not very good, the language is archaic, the manners and morals of the characters are ridiculous, but it’s astonishing how much his description of how The Oligarchy seized power in the United States (I think he had in mind a date within [...]

  • I don’t think I understand what you are saying here, but I get the impression your rant is somehow meant to express the idea that all progressives/liberals are bad, bad, bad and hypocritical to goot, nyah, nyah, nyah.

    “After all, the progressive policy position on the law is the law is whatever the president says it is, not what the Congress and courts determine the law to be.” Where on earth does that come from? The whole comment thread, except yours and I’m not sure what yours is saying, is that the DOJ is trying to defend a position that is against the law, is indefensible on moral grounds, and contradicts the whole purpose of the judicial system. The Department of Justice (have I mentioned that I think Holder is the worst AG since Ed Meese?) seems to be arguing that any witness who does not commit perjury can/should be fired from his/her job. This is insane.

  • Acharn commented on the blog post Top Ten At Ten 2/13/2014

    2014-02-14 05:29:13View | Delete

    One heck of a deterrent? Can you name a case you’re thinking of? Because I can’t think of one. I can think of cases of self-serving politicians getting the axe, like Thomas Cromwell or Sir Thomas More (really a rotten bastard), but they weren’t nailed for their corruption, which was epic, but for other sins, mostly treason (which was very broadly defined as displeasing the monarch in those days). Also the idea of the death penalty as a deterrent is pretty well refuted by the prevalence of pickpockets at Tyburn Elm on days when pickpockets were being hanged.

  • Acharn commented on the diary post VIDEO: DEA Official Announces Drug Bust of Son /s by jbade.

    2014-02-08 06:07:52View | Delete

    I don’t get it. Was this supposed to be funny?

  • Acharn commented on the blog post Eric Holder Proves He Can Fear Monger With the Best of Them

    2013-05-17 20:02:28View | Delete

    Yes, I think that about 90%, maybe more, of classified material is classified because it would be embarrassing to let out. One thing is, we really don’t know what leak this is. Maybe it’s the leak about the underpants bomb. More likely it’s something else, that AP didn’t actually publish. I’ve seen several comments in different threads suggesting that this operation was meant to intimidate AP into not publishing something. Since their normal preference is not to publish anything the government asks them not to, this would have to be something really explosive. If it is, we’ll hear eventually. Nobody can keep the Villagers from gossiping. If it’s just another Benghazi, Benghazi, BENGHAZI! we probably won’t.

  • I dunno. I could see him giving up on attempts to, say, cut or cap the home mortgage deduction. He certainly isn’t going to go for the carried interest transfer to the wealthy, or capital gains tax rates. He surely isn’t going to try to get more on the estate tax. I think, though, he’s going to keep trying to impose Chained CPI. He’s said since January 2009 that he believes Social Security benefits must be cut. It’s a basic principle with him. No matter how much the Republicans have thrown the proposal back in his face he keeps offering it to them. The Republicans want to run against the Democrats for cutting Social Security, they don’t want to be seen as the reason for Chained CPI, and they don’t even want to be seen as accepting it. They want it to be a Democrat project pure and simple so they can take the Senate in 2014. I believe this is one thing Obama won’t let go.

  • Acharn commented on the diary post Drone Pilots Expose Politicians’ Lies by David Swanson.

    2013-05-17 05:27:14View | Delete

    This is the part that bothers me: “…that individual fired at Americans or coalition forces, or planted an IED — did something that met the rules of engagement and the laws of armed conflict, and I am tasked to strike that individual.” See, the “pilot” doesn’t know what the target is supposed to have done. [...]

  • Acharn commented on the blog post Why the Sequester Strategy Is Doomed to Fail

    2013-04-27 18:00:38View | Delete

    This dynamic is likely going to render the sequester completely ineffective as a tool to spur a big deficit plan.

    Good! What the f*ck do we want a “big deficit plan” for anyway? You know what their “big deficit plan” is? End all Social Security benefits but continue the tax. You know where that starts? With Chained CPI. Probably you’re too young to remember after World War II when the Soviet Union was consolidating control over Eastern Europe. In many places the local Communists used what was called “the Salami Technique.” Don’t try to take the whole salami at once, just take a little slice from the end, nobody will mind. The John Birch Society (Koch Brothers’ father) advocated using Communist tactics to achieve their own agenda. The Grand Bargain is really the Great Betrayal.

  • Acharn commented on the diary post Austerity for STEM Jobs by anotherquestion.

    2013-04-27 05:36:35View | Delete

    Not to mention Obama’s constant call for “revenue-neutral” “reforms” to the tax code. Why “revenue-neutral?” We need more revenue. We don’t need to “broaden the base.” We especially don’t need to “lower rates.” All the confusion from the austerians (including Obama) is just designed to get past the demands for higher taxes on the wealthy without [...]

  • “Senior administration officials who briefed reporters on budget details said Mr. Obama would shield low-income senior, veterans and the very elderly from the change in Social Security inflation adjustments.” Very interesting. Where can I learn more, and why is this being kept so secret? Is it just because that’s the Obama default? Most secretive administration ever? Whistle-blowers are the greatest threat to our national security? Seriously, with all the outrage from all sides about how Chained CPI is actually a cut to benefits, why isn’t anyone in the administration explaining how they’re really protecting the “most vulnerable”? Where’s Nancy Pelosi on this? Where’s Axelrod, Plouffe, Valerie Jarrett? This is just like 2010 when they made it a point not to tell people the good things (if there are any) about the PPACA. Look how well that worked out.

  • “I’d rather go out with a bang than a whimper.” Yeah, well in some jurisdictions already you might get your wish as a S.W.A.T. team with armored vehicle smash down your doors and shoot up everyone inside. I expect this will become more widespread as time passes. You’ll be safer if you don’t have an AR-15-style weapon, and don’t make any move to defend yourself or your family, but we see all the time that it doesn’t really matter. If they feel like blowing you away they can always say, “Gee, I could have sworn he had a gun.” and the courts will hold them harmless.

  • Well, I largely agree with your analysis, but I’m doubtful that the CIA is making a lot of money off marijuana. They probably are off of Afghan opium, that was their product of choice back in the 70s, in the Golden Triangle where they had remnants of Chiang Kai Shek’s army to do the work for them. They’re still there, still doing the same thing, but they’ve been cut back a lot because the generals in Myanmar weren’t satisfied with the cut they were getting. The story I remember about why we’re in Afghanistan goes like this: fter 9/11 Bush and Cheney decided from opinions in the 16 intelligence agencies that probably Osama Bin Laden’s organization had been behind the attack. They then peremprorily demanded that Mullah Omar arrest Bin Laden and ship him to the U.S. for a fair trial before we executed him. Now Mullah Omar felt that Afghanistan, having beaten the Russian, was a sovereign nation, and they had a functioning courts system. Besides, Bin Laden was his son-in-law. So he said that we could send our evidence over and he would try Bin Laden in and Afghan court, and if Bin Laden was convicted the court would determine his punishment in accordance with their laws. Of course this was completely unacceptable to the Americans because, of course, they had no evidence against Bin Laden, and besides who were these uppity wogs to be denying the demands of The Emperoe Palpatine… I mean the President of the United States. Now as it happened there was a low-level infurrection going on against the Taliban in Afghanistan, so the Americans started sending huge amounts of weapons and some “advisers” to help them and that’s how we are where we are now. Of course preventing the Chinese pipeline is important, too, but many conservative deny it. We had a different pipeline almost agreed on before the unpleasantness, and conservatives deny that, too.

  • I don’t get why the Chained CPI would constitute a tax increase. I understand how the tax rates are adjusted for changes in the CPI, and I suppose the changes are currently based on the CPI-W, just as Social Security is. What I don’t get is why the connection couldn’t/wouldn’t be severed if CCPI was used for Social Security. Congress could specify anything it wants. There are many “official” indexes: CPI-W, CPI-U, C-CPI, CPI-E, etc. Congress could simply say, “We’re gonna use CCPI for Social Security, CPI-W for tax rates, and something else for whatever.” Can someone explain why they can’t/won’t do that?

  • “No one is above the law” is quaint.

  • Acharn commented on the blog post Mr. President, Have Pity On The Working Man

    2012-12-29 19:58:56View | Delete

    I didn’t keep the title of his book, but Al Franken spotted a quote from Barbara Tuchman that I missed:

    In her book A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous Fourteenth Century, Barbara Tuchman writes about a peasant revolt in 1358 that began in the village of St. Leu and spread throughout the Oise Valley. At one estate, the serfs sacked the manor house, killed the knight, and roasted him on a spit in front of his wife and kids. Then, after ten or twelve peasants violated the lady, with the children still watching, they forced her to eat the roasted flesh of her dead husband and then killed her. That is class warfare. Arguing over the optimum marginal tax rate for the top 1 percent is not.

    – Al Franken

  • Acharn commented on the blog post Silent Night: Another American Suicide In Afghanistan

    2012-12-26 07:22:25View | Delete

    I was a personnel sergeant, and while stationed in Vietnam I was involved in casualty reporting. Generally there weren’t any; I was assigned to a signal battalion in Pleiku province and after 3d Infantry Division relocated to Nha Trang our area was pretty quiet except for some rocket attacks from January to about April 1970. We had one guy killed by enemy action, shrapnel from a 122mm rocket penetrated the back of his flak jacket. We had two suicides, and I’ve been thinking about them because of the hysteria over Banghazi. One of them I don’t remember anything about. The other I recall because the kid switched his M-16 to full auto before he shot himself and a stray round hit his room-mate (we were in a really comfortable base but nothing like what they have now). Within half an hour after the initial report was submitted we started getting questions from higher and higher in the chain of command. It turned out not many people knew the kid very well, he was about half way through his 12 month tour, and the people who did know him were out on their jobs throughout the province, so it took about a day before we could talk to them all. Just like with the Benghazi reporting, we weren’t able to answer all the questions immediately, and I can tell you we were under trememdous pressure to try. Eventually, IIRC we even had a Congressional inquiry about it, and those require IMMEDIATE response from the battalion commander. We never did come up with any satisfactory answer as to why.

    Sorry if I’m going off-topic. We had suicide problems back then, but nowhere near what they have now. I was interested by the datum that most of the suicides have never deployed. I wonder what that means. I don’t intend to disrespect Cdr. Price, but I wonder if his team has been involved in night raids or prisoner interrogation. I’m an agnostic, but I pray on a daily basis to give thanks for the good things in my life — after all, I don’t really know whether or not there’s a god who cares, but it doesn’t cost me anything, it can’t hurt, and it seems to make my life better. I think I’ll include a prayer for him tonight.

  • Load More