Garrett

Last active
3 months, 4 weeks ago
  • A detail about the Manadel al-Jamadi death.

    One of the first military officers to show up after the death was M.P. Captain Chris Brinson. He was responsible for sneaking the body out of the prison.

    Brinson was also responsible for the cover up of the October 25, 2003 rape of a 15 year old male prisoner at Abu Ghraib. And much more.

    Brinson, today, is legislative director for Rep. Mike Rogers of Alabama.

    Primary Abu Ghraib guy, walking the halls of Congress, while the lower-level people went to prison. It’s certainly a lack of accountability.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post Reggie Walton Unleashes the Rocket’s Red Glare

    2011-07-14 15:52:21View | Delete

    The Wikileaks Guantanamo documents clearly show intelligence exploitation value being used as reason to continue to hold them, with combatant status determinations being a charade.

    Abdul Rahim al Janko being a good example. Since he was being held in a Taliban prison, the idea that he was a combatant against us is just plain absurd. But they held him for intelligence exploitation value because he knew stuff about Taliban prisons.

    But then, this too is a charade. People assessed as having low intelligence value, and obviously held long after they could have intelligence value, were held for having exploitable intelligence value anyway.

    I’d wonder if some sort of “Pacha Wazir had exploitable knowledge of hawala banking” “determinations” were made.

    At any rate, the charades behind charades, with known-false information being presented in determinations and legal filings, and the real reasons being withheld, all lies behind lies behind lies, is a deep government fraud on our legal system, and a very sad state of affairs.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post Reggie Walton Unleashes the Rocket’s Red Glare

    2011-07-14 14:36:17View | Delete

    Semi-off-topic to Oops, that testimony should not have been presented:

    Benjamin Wittes, over at lawfare points out a Washington Post story that Oops, once again, the government has released a document they now want back.

    “EST criteria and determinations are not currently a topic in our sensitive bilateral discussions with other countries,” said the official, William K. Lietzau, who added that “revelation of EST criteria would likely complicate those discussions.”

    WaPo

    If it is a topic in our sensitive bilateral discussions, the document should be returned, because release of it complicates our sensitive bilateral discussions. And if it isn’t a topic in our sensitive bilateral discussions, the document should be returned, because release of it complicates our sensitive bilateral discussions.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post On Two Torture Investigations

    2011-07-14 11:28:42View | Delete

    We’ve only been told that the CIA waterboarded 3 people. No one that I’m aware of has stepped out and denied that the DOD’s SAP did it too

    The DOJ IG report on FBI involvement describes what I’d consider a commonly used “field expedient waterboarding” technique.

    However, we found that four FBI agents were present during an interview of Saleh and another detainee in March 2004 in which a DOD interrogator poured water down the detainees’ throat while the detainees were in a cuffed, kneeling position

    Saleh’s statement about his treatment is worth reading, at pdf page 20 of the CID investigation.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post On Two Torture Investigations

    2011-07-14 10:30:51View | Delete

    Another item to consider in a timeline the capture of ex-Baathist Manadel al-Jamadi on Nov. 4, 2003, is Operation Victory Bounty, a large-scale roundup of Baathists happening at the time. You can consider it the hunt for Saddam, and as starting with the deaths of Uday and Qusay.

    Here’s Jon Stewart on it, on Aug. 3, 2003. Camp Vigilant within Abu Ghraib can be thought of as a large outdoor razorwire POW camp built specifically for the roundup.

    Ghost prisoner schemes would work well, to get around the EPW status that al-Jamadi and others would have.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post Our Unilateral Counterterrorism Operations in Somalia

    2011-07-12 17:23:49View | Delete

    A hopefully better link to the Marine paper on Comprehensive Approach.

    And from last year, a reference about it, in the Review Report of the Quadrennial Review Report:

    The need for enhanced “whole of government” capabilities will be driven by the complex operating conditions, strong potential for civilian interaction, and the need in many cases to work closely with the agencies of a foreign government. It is in the interest of the Department of Defense to work closely with the National Security Council, the State Department, State/AID, and DHS to develop support for more enhanced civilian capability and for putting into operation “whole of government” and Comprehensive Approach solutions to security challenges.

    Comprehensive Approach is a deep intertwining of Military, Intelligence, State, NGOs, foreign militias, and just about everything else, with military needs as the driver.

    Don Rumsfeld dressed down a bit to bring the NGOs in. When, of course, it is a very very bad thing for an NGO to get intertwined with Don Rumsfeld.

    Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan is a prime example of the approach.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post Our Unilateral Counterterrorism Operations in Somalia

    2011-07-12 16:56:17View | Delete

    Who is that Paris-based crude propaganda outfit, that the news item was dredged up from? They have Le Monde and stuff in their backgrounds.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post Our Unilateral Counterterrorism Operations in Somalia

    2011-07-12 15:53:56View | Delete

    One of the ways a murky CIA/JSOC/Somali intelligence joint operation would be doctrine, and not a rouge operation, is under the “Comprehensive Approach“. The working at levels below national leadership strikes me as being a direct implementation of it.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post Emptywheel Leaving Firedoglake

    2011-07-12 14:21:18View | Delete

    This is sad. The recent Book Salon with Glenn Carle is just one small example of the astonishingly good work you have done here.

    I’ll continue following the excellent FDL coverage of the issues. And I look forward to seeing you in your new home.

  • “During his capture, he resisted in an extreme way,” Martine said. “During that struggle, things were knocked over. He banged his head against things.”

    A rifle butt, for one thing. Al-Jamadi banged his face against a SEAL’s rifle butt.

    Recent news stories have also been implying that al-Jamadi, while chained to a chair, banged his chest against a CIA interrogator, in a slow steady forceful way, resulting in the six broken ribs.

  • Coming from a somewhat different direction:

    I’ve gotten a lot of assist in understanding Barack Obama’s (or the Administration’s) theory of military detention, directly from the site, and with Benjamin Wittes posts definitely being a part of it.

    I wish they had commenting there, so questions could be asked. But I can also see why they wouldn’t.

  • He was questioned by members of the High Value Interrogation Group, a unit made up of FBI, CIA and Defense Department personnel

    That’s more by org chart than telling us who actually did what.

    But intelligence extracted by FBI, CIA, and DOD. Then criminal investigated by the FBI.

    How very unclean.

  • Whether “Anatomy of a Lead,” a CIA memo title in the previous story, counts as an indirect shoutout, I wouldn’t know.

  • For the ship thing

    One of the unanswered questions of the Obama administration’s counterterrorism strategy has been what it would do if it captured an important terrorist. Obama does not want to send more people to Guantanamo Bay and the CIA’s so-called black sites” are closed.

    what it really says, is that Black Sites are open, not closed. They just put them on a boat. Which is pretty much where they originally started.

  • This sentence is an informative example

    WARSAME, a Somali national in his mid-twenties, was captured in the Gulf region by the U.S. military on April 19, 2011, and was questioned for intelligence purposes for more than two months. Thereafter, WARSAME was read his Miranda rights

    of how the policy of a pre-Miranda “intelligence collection” period works, in practice. “More than two months,” we know from it.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post The Drone War on Westphalia

    2011-07-04 16:26:28View | Delete

    I consider it to be a Law of Warfare, that as the technological accuracy and range and power of weapons increases, the proportion of civilians killed always increases too.

    The theory starts with that “Originally, there were rocks” style disquisition. Which is kind of embarrassing.

    Good figures are impossible to come by, but consider it one civilian per nine soldiers killed in the Civil War, pivoting at one to one in World War II, and an astonishing number of civilians killed, per soldier, in Iraq.

    As a corollary: the military, at every new introduction of a technology that will naturally and inevitably kill a greater proportion of civilians, will claim that it naturally and inevitably kills fewer. See: Drones.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post The Drone War on Westphalia

    2011-07-04 13:57:31View | Delete

    The Rocket Wars in the Kingdom of Mysore

    The rocket wars in Mysore were between the British East India Company and, well, Mysore.

    The rocket wars happened roughly between 1760 and 1800.

    Tipu Sultan wrote a military manual called Fathul Mujahidin in which 200 rocket men were prescribed to each Mysorean “cushoon” (brigade).

    wiki

    I bring this loosely referential point up, because we get to go out tonight and oo and ah over the futuristic high-tech rocket attack being rained down on us. We are asked, fairly explicitly, to ponder our bravery in standing up to it. We are also asked, less explicitly, to emphasize the rockets over the pieces of paper.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post The WikiLeaks Suit against Visa and MasterCard

    2011-07-03 14:50:03View | Delete

    In a general/political way, I like

    With such power comes the special responsibility not to distort competition by their actions and conduct.

    as a framework for thinking about regulation in non- or anti-competitive, dominated markets.

  • 3. rebuts evidence introduced by the people of the victim’s failure to engage in sexual intercourse, deviate sexual intercourse or sexual contact during a given period of time;

    This rule makes my head spin.

    I know what it means. But it’s expressed in a thoroughly head-spinning way.

  • Garrett commented on the blog post Wither Stephen Kappes?

    2011-07-01 11:29:44View | Delete

    In the al-Jamadi case, also don’t forget the bleach bottle. They disposed of the bloody hood. They scrubbed down the blood in the shower.

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