• prostratedragon commented on the diary post Saturday Art: Mary Magdalene by Elliott.

    2014-04-20 00:30:45View | Delete

    From 2010, one of Roger Ebert’s essays on Mary Magdalene:

    An Affront to the Eyes of God

    And of course in keeping with today’s occasion, our word “maudlin*” is from the name Magdalene, after its pronunciation among the English. _______________ *one who weeps copiously but without cause, as at the tomb of one who has been [...]

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for April 16th, 2014

    2014-04-16 22:17:56View | Delete

    Heh, I too have wondered if Young George weren’t trying to paint something out of his head.

    “Sweet Dreams Are Made of This,” The Soul Rebels Brass Band

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for April 15th, 2014

    2014-04-15 22:06:23View | Delete

    Is that The Onion’s all-time best headline?

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for April 15th, 2014

    2014-04-15 22:01:20View | Delete

    Drummer Terri Lyne Carrington and trio revisit Duke Ellington’s “Money Jungle”, and give us a chance to ponder the dear and the cheap.

    (Here’s the original. I like ‘em both, a lot.)

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for April 9th, 2014

    2014-04-10 02:30:07View | Delete

    A little food for thought:

    the researchers found that children’s cereals are typically placed on the bottom two shelves and the mascots deploy “a downward gaze at an angle of 9.67 degrees.” This creates an average gaze for the characters a little more than 20 inches above the ground, which is pretty handy for grabbing the attention of small kids in the grocery aisle.

    Adult cereals work similarly, too.

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for April 9th, 2014

    2014-04-10 01:04:36View | Delete

    That’s quite a story behind the Pollock work “Number 5.” So often we don’t really know what it is we’re doing.

    On the other hand, it is possible to try harder than some are doing now to figure it out. Repurposed for our time: “Satin Dal?”.

    Or for those who swear by Basie, “Lil Dal-ing?”
    [scurries away]

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for April 7th, 2014

    2014-04-08 01:30:37View | Delete

    1950 was a great year for film noir. Mickey Rooney got in on it with a good one, Quicksand.

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Weekend Roundup for April 5-6th, 2014

    2014-04-07 01:12:24View | Delete

    A little theatrical music suggested by some of the recent education news:

    Main Titles/The Award/All the Eves/Encore from All About Eve (1950). Music by Alfred Newman (of the famous composing Newmans)

    That’s the character Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter) who is artfully framed by a pair of dueling pistols over a mantelpiece, in “The Award” section.

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for April 3rd, 2014

    2014-04-04 00:03:38View | Delete

    Oh that John McLaughlin!

    Always good to see the classics on board —one of the greatest albums, period. The piece on there that rearranged my mind permanently is “Pharoah’s Dance” by Joe Zawinul (I think the only one not actually by Davis on the set). Never thought that a mere piece of music could terrify me, having already heard some Schoenberg, Stravinsky, and such. I lasted about 30 seconds before leaving the room. The thing had to stop and shut off on its own. I was ok in a couple of days, though.

    Part 1, the first 7 or so minutes
    “Pharoah’s Dance” full piece

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post Late Night: Nervous as a Whore in Church

    2014-04-03 22:15:30View | Delete

    and are currently running naked through the streets, screaming about the egregious travails of the uber-wealthy

    Recently I read somewhere that the Pope is planning one of those three-day prayer retreats for political and business leaders (Catholic ones of course) that follows prescribed exercises of Ignatius Loyola. It so happens that there is a movie that shows what I fervently hope is a fictionalized account of one of these retreats, from the mid-1970s. I’m quite sure that Pope Francis has seen this, and would guess that he is praying for a different outcome even now.

    The story takes place in a large rural house, definitely of a higher order than, say, even a large cabin. The decor is austere but elegant, and rather … somber, one might call it. On the first or second day, sometime after the entire Neapolitan delgation has beat a hasty departure and after the Miracle of the Disappearing Body and Blood, the retreaters perform the Holy Rosary exercise, led by the convening priest, who has a much too clear view of everyone’s complicity including his own.

    They start out in a kind of walking meditation, much as one might do with one’s elderly mother in the garden, but the pace quickens and voices rise in tension. At the point where some participants begin to faint, the words “Hail Mary” have begun to sound like “Come here, you — and get me out of here!”

    Sort of like our fully bought in ruling class is beginning to sound.

    (Of course, the particular religion has nothing to do with it I think. We Congregationalists (UCC) customarily recite together a prayer of general confession in church services. I can assure you that the effect is sometimes every bit as macabre. Religion is a force that gives human spookiness structure and direction.)

    Todo Modo (1976) — Il Santo Rosario (4.5min)

  • That decision by Roberts is worth a glance, by anyone who can stand it. As if intellectual mediocrity were not the cradle of sin, he writes:

    In a series of cases over the past 40 years, we have spelled out how to draw the constitutional line between the permissible goal of avoiding corruption in the political process and the impermissible desire simply to limit polit- ical speech. We have said that government regulation may not target the general gratitude a candidate may feel toward those who support him or his allies, or the political access such support may afford. âIngratiation and access . . . are not corruption.â [Citizens United v. Federal Election Commân, 558 U. S. 310, 360 (2010).] They embody a central feature of democracyâthat constituents support candidates who share their beliefs and interests, and candidates who are elected can be expected to be responsive to those concerns.

    Any regulation must instead target what we have called âquid pro quoâ corruption or its appearance. See id., at 359. That Latin phrase captures the notion of a direct exchange of an official act for money. See McCormick v. United States, 500 U. S. 257, 266 (1991). âThe hallmark of corruption is the financial quid pro quo: dollars for po- litical favors.â Federal Election Commân v. National Con- servative Political Action Comm., 470 U. S. 480, 497 (1985). Campaign finance restrictions that pursue other objectives, we have explained, impermissibly inject the Government âinto the debate over who should govern.â Bennett, supra, at ___ (slip op., at 25). And those who govern should be the last people to help decide who should govern.

    Needless to say, this is the first point taken on in his dissent by Justice Breyer.

    The 5 do seem to be slow-walking through the filed appeals to just the result that Shutterbuggery says.

  • Glad to see someone look into this at last. There is another font set, available free of charge in Type1, that might perform even better in an ink-use test, and that is the Modern font. TeX users know it as Computer Modern but anyone who knows how to add fonts to their system, e.g. The Federal Government, should be able to use the set in their choice of word processor. (Is ATM still the method of choice?)

    It’s professional-looking, well enough equipped to set mathematical papers and foreign languages that use Roman equivalents correctly, and while not too exciting, is no duller than Times New Roman [z-z-z-z]. I do believe its standard weight is lighter than Garamond of the same size.

    On to full-color-background colophon pages!

    _________
    Dr. A.-A. Royer-Collard: “We produce books for the discriminating collector. The compulsive inmates set the type, the listless ones do the binding and prepare the ink.”
    —[i]Quills[/i] (2000)

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for March 26th, 2014

    2014-03-27 01:28:27View | Delete

    Another link to Tony Atkinson and Salvatore Morelli’s The chartbook of economic inequality, this time at VoxEU, because you can’t have too many. For those who have never seen it, the Chartbook uses data to answer several questions for each of 25 countries, including you-know-who:

    Has the dispersion of earnings been increasing in recent decades?
    Has overall income inequality increased in recent years?
    Have there been periods when overall inequality fell in a sustained way?
    Has poverty been rising or falling over the past decades?
    The US and certain other countries have seen top income shares first fall and then rise, is there a U-shaped pattern of this kind?
    Has the concentration of wealth moved in the same way as income inequality?

    The authors frequently collaborate with Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez.

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for March 20th, 2014

    2014-03-20 23:48:47View | Delete

    The beautiful music is vital therapy for dealing with the news.

    I think I’ve posted this recently, but the stories about children and youths reminded me of it:

    Strings of the Philadelphia Sinfonia (a youth orchestra), Melodia en La Menor, Astor Piazzolla

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Weekend Roundup for March 15-16th, 2014

    2014-03-17 02:06:22View | Delete

    Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Piketty sounds like a getter. DeLong excerpts several reviews.

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for March 10th, 2014

    2014-03-10 22:41:10View | Delete

    Something I’ve been suspecting lately:

    “Spring is Here,” by Richard Rodgers
    Kenny Barron, piano; Charlie Haden, bass

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for February 26th, 2014

    2014-02-26 20:27:50View | Delete

    Somehow I’m just hearing of this movie; must catch it.

    Was lucky around 10 years ago I guess, to see him with his flamenco ensemble, two other guitarists and a worthy successor to de la Isla singing. The audience was finally just stunned. Who knows what he started?

  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for February 26th, 2014

    2014-02-26 19:00:25View | Delete
  • prostratedragon commented on the blog post The Roundup for February 20th, 2014

    2014-02-20 23:09:50View | Delete

    Oh my! There are several headlines tonight that sound like parodies, but alas are not. That one takes the prize.

    Speaking of Miss Dinah, here’s one of Etta Jones’s biggest:

    Don’t Go to Strangers

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