…not sure, but apparently, the contest is to see if either Booker or the Tea Partier changes their mind, after just eating via food stamps.

Cory Booker challenges tea partier to live on food stamps for a week

Booker had touched off a Twitter argument by quoting the Greek historian Plutarch, who wrote that “an imbalance between rich and poor is the oldest and most fatal ailment of all republics.”

That quote, he explained, underpins an argument for public investment in education and nutrition, which he said would save money on police and prisons. That’s when @MWadeNC chimed in, saying ”nutrition is not a responsibility of the government.”

“Lets you and I try to live on food stamps in New Jersey (high cost of living) and feed a family for a week or month,” Booker wrote. “U game?

IMO, food stamps are a prime indicator of government dysfunction. If there was a robust economy and American workers were protected from globalism’s relative slave labor rates, there would be little need for food stamps, and Americans would be psychologically healthier, instead of dependent on the government. I like Cory Booker, but he’s a corporatist of the Democratic variety.

Earth to Cory Booker: Food stamps are chump change compared to what a realistic living wage would provide. And why not push the government to provide jobs, when the private sector fails to?

Who knows what the Tea Partier is thinking – probably that personal charity and begging are just fine for people who fall through the cracks.

Booker wants to put this challenge on video, which I think is a great idea. Not sure what he’s thinking, but the working poor get too little attention in this country, and Booker’s celebrity might make videos related to working poor go viral.

I don’t watch TV, but because I never hear of any reality shows dealing with politically related issues, I assume that they don’t exist. I don’t understand that, because the little reality TV I’ve seen was awfully boring, so I assume that there has to be a market for reality shows that could show up the defects of government in the US. Instead of arguing about trivialities, anger could be focused on politically indifferent neighbors and dysfunctional government bureaucrats and elected officials.

Maybe Booker will start a new trend.