There was a very interesting interview of Greg Palast on Gary Null’s PRN.FM (progressive radio network) program, today. Palast has determined that the NeoCons wanted to force Iraq to sell oil cheaply, and help collapse Saudi Arabia’s economy and smash OPEC.

Big Oil views Saudi Arabia as a partner, to keep oil prices sky high. Big Oil wanted/wants a strong OPEC…. therefore, it is important to keep Iraqi oil (mostly) off the market.

I was only half-listening, so I didn’t get straight about whether there was genuine concern, by Big Oil, about Sadaam Hussein flooding the markets with Iraqi oil, and thus the Iraq invasion was partly (or largely) motivated as a protection against such a scenario.

Or did the Big Oil vs. Neocon tussle occur after the invasion?

Via skimming Palast’s How Bush won the war in Iraq – really!

The neo-con idea was to break up and sell off Iraq’s oil fields, ramp up production, flood the world oil market – and thereby smash OPEC and with it, the political dominance of Saudi Arabia.

General Jay Garner also confirmed the plan to grab the oil. Indeed, Garner told me that Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld fired him, when the General, who had lived in Iraq, complained the neo-con grab would set off a civil war. It did. Nevertheless, Rumsfeld replaced Garner with a new American viceroy, Paul Bremer, a partner in Henry Kissinger’s firm, to complete the corporate takeover of Iraq’s assets – “especially the oil”.

……..

Weirdly, I was uncovering that the US oil industry was using its full political mojo to prevent their being handed ownership of Iraq’s oil fields. That’s right: The oil companies did NOT want to own the oil fields – and they sure as hell did not want the oil. Just the opposite. They wanted to make sure there would be a limit on the amount of oil that would come out of Iraq.

There was no way in hell that Baker’s clients, from Exxon to Abdullah, were going to let a gaggle of neo-con freaks smash up Iraq’s oil industry, break OPEC production quotas, flood the market with six million barrels of Iraqi oil a day and thereby knock its price back down to $13 a barrel where it was in 1998.