Via We can get rid of Assad or fight al-Qaeda, but we can’t do both

A former MI6 officer, his think tank, “Conflict Forums”, with input from
Russians, Iranians, and 3 Shia Millitant Groups Agree, have provided a insights that I find credible, but contrary to Western fantasies narratives about Syria and the Middle East.

These are:

A crucial battle is now being fought at Qalamoun, in the west. The Syrian army and rebel forces are engaged in a ferocious battle for this strategic ridge, which controls the all-important supply line between Lebanon and rebel territory. We were told that the Battle of Qalamoun was all over bar the shouting, and that it will fall to Assad’s forces quite soon.

The greatest threat to stability is Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia is at risk from blow back of his heavy sponsorship of Islamic extremists, many of whom deny the legitimacy of any state or secular power.

There are indications that some Western leaders have begun to wake up:
Meanwhile, Robert Ford, the American diplomat who has been the chief US organiser for the Syrian rebels – herding them in and out of negotiations during the failed Geneva talks two weeks ago – has also got the chop. These changes of personnel come amid reports that the Obama administration has confronted the Saudis with a file full of evidence of their involvement in terrorism in Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen. This report can be found in Al-Akhbar English, a Lebanese newspaper seen as close to Hizbollah. The newspaper hints at the possibility that Saudi could yet be formally classified by the UN security council as a state sponsor of global terrorism. That sounds fanciful, but President Obama’s visit to Riyadh next month now looks pregnant with significance.

(emphasis mine)