The National Whistleblowers Center is on record that Department of Defense contractors already had access to jury trials, and that Section 827(e) of the NDAA Bill, the IC loophole, (now codified at 41 U.S.C. 4712(e)) was a new provision that did not previously exist in the law.

So why did it get tacked on to a bill supposedly enhancing rights for government contractors who blow the whistle?

Here’s a relevant timeline of events related to NDAA lobbying:

  • Fourth Quarter of 2012: The Government Accountability Project lobbies Congress for passage of H.R. 4310 (the NDAA bill).
  • Monday, Dec. 10, 2012: Via email, GAP solicits signatures for an organizational petition letter (.docx).
  • Monday, Dec. 17: GAP emails the signatories to the petition letter, saying that “[t]he following has not been publicly announced yet, but we have been informed that the federal contractor provision – through our advocacy and staff negotiations – has overcome opposition.” (Emphasis added.)
  • Tuesday, Dec. 18: A House/Senate conference approves section 827(e), stripping protections for intelligence community contractors.
  • Wednesday, Dec. 19: GAP asks the signatories to hold off on publicizing the petition letter.
  • Wednesday, Dec. 19: NWC issues a “Take Action” alert, both via email and a website announcement, for the public to “urge Congress to protect National Security Whistleblowers.”
  • Friday, Dec. 21: Congress passes the NDAA bill with the loophole intact.
  • Friday, Dec. 21: GAP praises Congress for its action but also criticizes the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence for insisting on inclusion of the loophole.
  • Monday, Dec. 24: GAP emails members of the whistleblower community with news of the bill’s passage.
  • Wednesday, Jan. 2: President Obama signs the NDAA bill, issues a signing statement that concerns some members of Congress and divides GAP.

Please note: this bill would not have protected Edward Snowden, even assuming the loophole was not enacted and he used approved channels, because the bill takes effect only on July 1, 2013 (see Sec. 827(i)) and applies to contracts and task orders entered on or after that date.

But this bill also does nothing to protect others who are concerned, as Snowden was.