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THAT’LL SHOW ’EM
The National Police Agency and the Japan Securities Dealers Association announced new measures intended to keep yakuza groups from… stock trading.

Leading online game operator Gree blamed a software glitch for overcharging the accounts of 733 minors—including 30 kids who were stuck with bills of more than ¥100,000 each.

Education officials in Saitama have developed a system that enables students to report bullying incidents via mobile phone.

It was reported that the Japanese are trying to save electricity this winter by “warmth sharing”—that is, “the communal use of warm and toasty places.”

stats

3,139
Number of “noticeable” earthquakes in Japan last year, according to the meteorological agency

1,868
Number of these earthquakes that were aftershocks of the March 11 megaquake

66
Percent of Chinese people who say they are boycotting Japanese goods, according to a newspaper survey

American Make-Your-Own-Pancake Restaurant “Slappy Cakes” Imports Deliciousness to Japan
Slappy Cakes is a popular pancake restaurant in Portland Oregon that lets customers create their own custom pancakes at their tables. It’s a fun time for those who want a completely new pancake experience. However, its popularity has resulted in some long wait times.

Luckily, Slappy Cakes’ success has allowed it to expand, but rather than add another location in Portland they decided to set up shop in completely uncharted DIY pancake house territory: Shinjuku, Tokyo. We sent Mr. Sato to a pre-opening demonstration for a report.

The Tokyo Slappy Cakes is located on the 7th floor of the Lumine Est building right by the busiest train station in the world. Prior to its 31 January opening, only elite members of the press such as Mr. Sato were allowed entry to this preview demonstration.

Perhaps It Just Plays One On TV.

You Would Be Wrong

At Their Best

Japan looks west, holds its breath as mainland pollution heads its way

News On Japan via South China Morning
The choking pollution that has shrouded large parts of the mainland is moving east to Japan, threatening to push levels of health-threatening PM2.5 particles there beyond World Health Organisation health standards.
Japanese computer simulations show the fine air particulates could reach 40 micrograms per cubic metre today or tomorrow and cause smog in parts of western Japan such as Nagasaki.