Cross posted at the demise

Alarmed at the thought of poor shelter-less citizens invading the public’s well-kept city benches, citizens in Davidson, NC motivated by their “concerned for the safety of the neighborhood” have reported to local officials that a vagrant has set up camp in front of St. Alban’s Episcopal Church.

The vagrant, an art installation by Timothy Schmalz, is a life size bronze of a man, sheltering himself against the cold with a makeshift blanket, sleeping on a park bench called “Homeless Jesus”. An indication that the bronze sleeping vagrant is the Christ, the homeless wandering religious philosopher of the first century who challenged the people of his time to “give up all you own and follow” and, in later centuries, was exalted as the “king of kings”, are nail wounds on his exposed bare feet. The bronze is accompanied by a plaque with the gospel verse from Matthew; “as you did it to one of the least of my brothers, you did it to me.”

Rev. David Buck, St. Alban’s minister, told USA Today that the life-size statue that beckons viewers to become part of the work by leaving space on the ‘park bench’ for a single person to sit “makes people think about their faith commitment and the plight of the homeless in this country.” Rev, Buck feels that the art work, which is on church property, reflects the church’s commitment to social justice. Buck said that it is important to remember that “faith expresses itself not in beautiful buildings only, but mainly in care for those less fortunate, the marginalized.”

The artist had originally attempted to gain the cooperation of St. Michael’s Cathedral in Toronto and St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York (both Catholic churches) to display the art work, but had been turned down by both churches.

Concerned citizen Cindy Castano Swannack, who called the police to report the loitering artwork, when advised that the homeless person was actually art that had found a home, said she disagreed with the depiction of Christ as a vulnerable fellow human stating that Jesus was “not a vagrant” and not someone “who needs our help.”

As North Carolina citizens were coming face to face with a homeless Jesus, God himself sued the national credit reporting company Equifax for taking actions to prevent the deity from accessing Infiniti.

God Gazarov, who has a godly credit score of over 720, states in court documents that Equifax has prevented him from securing financing for the Infiniti that he wants to jump in and take for spin around the known universe, or at lease Brooklyn.

Gazarov, a Russian citizen who shares his first name with his grandfather, claims that Equifax has blocked him from accessing his credit file and score because security measures that the company uses refuse to accept that his given name, God, is his real name.

Gazarov says in his complaint that the company has denied his existence for more than 2 years, and his credit history, as reported by the company, is as empty as Christ’s tomb, preventing Gazarov from getting approved for credit cards and loans. Gazarov said that Equifax customer service personnel have even suggested that he change his first name to facilitate smoother credit transactions.

Equifax said that it was working with God to resolve problems with his account. The company says it “has processes in place to help ensure that businesses and individuals requesting access to credit are who they say they are. These processes flag standalone names that generally may not be associated with the valid openings of credit accounts.”

Gazarov’s attorney said that the company now, after the revelation of the court action, may indeed be ready to acquiesce and admit the existence of God.