From the annals of Brooklyn justice an illuminating tale, casting in bold relief the true venality of prosecutors trolling for easy pleas.

As the charging documents would have it, defendant Shaborn Emmanuel was a particularly dangerous fellow. In a common commercial conundrum, he had accepted drugs on consignment and now found himself, through circumstances not made immediately clear, in possession of neither the inventory nor the money owed therefore.

His supplier, evidently unconvinced by the bald assertion that a thief had unfortunately made off with the goods, gave Emmanuel a choice. "Present me", he said "with my money or the head of the thief".

I think you can see where this story is going.

At a loss to actually produce a thief (hint:like so many retailers of fine drugs, he was probably.his own best customer) Emmanuel did the logical thing. He picked out a random junkie, and took a chain saw to his neck, thus placing himself in possession of the necessary trophy to satisfy his irate creditor.

So saith the indictment. (Emmanuel currently denies his previous plea of guilty).

Here is where the instructive part of the tale comes in. In return for his plea, the prosecutor agreed to a stipulated sentence of TWO YEARS TO SIX!!.

This can only be a monstrous miscarriage of justice: If guilty, a heinous psychopath will be loosed upon an unsuspecting public before the next set of presidential primaries. If innocent, a plea of guilty to a horrible act has been extorted by bringing the defendant to a precipice threatening him with spending his life in jail. (I incline towards the latter theory).

Simply put, it beggars imagination that a prosecutor sincerely believing a defendant to be such a cold blooded psychopath would offer a plea deal involving such a trivial sentence. One way or another, this prosecutor exemplifies everything that is wrong with our criminal "justice " system.