Any time the media provides any type of reporting that is favorable to Democrats or unfavorable to Republicans conservatives will scream that they are victims of the liberal media bias.  We all know of that ploy that conservatives use by now, and that this claim is bogus.

Anyway, I would like to go to the lengths to which conservatives will consider media commentary biased towards liberals and Democrats.  The clearest example was actually in 2004 when Tom Brokaw said that Bush had not united the country.  There was a conservative Republican I knew who claimed that such commentary was unprofessional.

Now we can discuss how the media should stop analyzing elections and polls.  That includes making predictions and discussing campaign tactics as though it were a football game.  Instead, the media should focus on the qualities of the candidates and the issues.  Tom Brokaw’s commentary went against this interest.  It is, however, clear that he was not expressing a liberal bias.

George W. Bush had an approval rating that was at 50% at best when he was running for reelection in 2004.  Lets look at the 2004 election results too.  He received 286 electoral votes to John Kerry’s 251, with what should have been a Kerry electorate voting for John Edwards.  W. received 51% of the popular vote to Kerry’s 48%. ( “FEDERAL ELECTIONS 2004: Election Results for the U.S. President, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives”. Federal Election Commission. May 2005.)

We, therefore, can see that W. Bush had not united the country.  It is a somewhat subjective matter as to whether an election is close or a landslide.  In this case, it is clear that the 2004 election was close and that half the country did not support Bush!  If we are to say it is unprofessional to proclaim that Bush had not united the country then it is unprofessional to say that Reagan’s reelection in 1984 was a landslide, even though he carried 49 states.

Of course I can recall the 1994 midterm elections in which the Republicans took over both houses of Congress for the first time in 40 years.  In the weeks after these elections the media talked about “the Republicans’ landslide at the polls.”  While the Republicans did well and gained a bunch of seats, it is hard to call their victory a landslide.  The Republicans only received 51% of the nationwide vote, the same as in 2004.  They, furthermore, held a 230-204 majority.  It was not a massive majority.  The Republicans narrowly controlled the Senate too, 53-47.(http://www.fec.gov/pubrec/fe1994/federalelections94.pdf)

Once again proclamations of liberal media bias are unfounded.