On the Rio Grande River, one side is the U.S., the other is Mexico.

It’s kind of amusing to hear right wingers insisting that the border just hasn’t been taken care of the way they would take care of it if only they were in charge.  Above is one picture taken this last week from a raft on the Rio Grande, the river that separates the two countries.  There in the distance where the river disappears in the picture, one side is one country, and the other side is the other.   This is what the scene has been since farther back than the ages of time.   Also, this is how it was when Republicans controlled the same areas.

At present, this administration has closed down this border.  While you’re rafting down the river, you are now not allowed to jump off onto the Mexican side.  Our guide tells about one offending crew that did as has always been done, hopping off and visiting with Mexican hosts who gave them a wonderful dinner and shared the amazing scenery, helped them load back up and continue on downriver.   At the end of the trip, a Park Service officer happened to ask one of the clients how they’d liked the river, and the recent visitor enthusiastically praised the hospitality of the recent Mexican hosts.  The whole crew was ‘detained’ for violating our Borders.  Of course, like many stories of vacation lore, this may just be an illustration for us rafters of the present moment.  However, it provides the illustration of why not to touch the shore over on that side, even if we’ve been tossed over by the currents.  . . .

In case you’re wondering, which side is which – in this picture, Mexico is on your right.  They’re identical.  We did have our lunch on the U.S. side, after spending quite awhile looking for one suitable shaded place.   The sun was on the other side of the river and all the shade was illegal.

Strand of barbed wire on the U.S. side of the Rio Grande.

There’s the border fence I liked best.   A few old strands of barbed wire that somebody put up sometime in the past few years, there’s your barrier to entry.

All along the border here in the Big Bend area, the river is often about as wide as a street, and obviously can be waded in either direction.   When stock strays,  surprise!  the owners go get it.

In the Rio Grande Village Campground in the Big Bend National Park, the neighboring Mexican village is easily visible.   The villagers used to make a little from selling handmade goods to visitors.  Now that’s not allowed.

When I drove over to Mexico at a legal crossing, Ciudad Ojinaga across from Presidio, TX, many of the large vehicles crossing from Texas were being pulled over and searched.   When I went back (with my truckload of illegal voters…well, I looked but couldn’t find it), I was asked what I was bringing back, and unfortunately it was just a cheap tank of gas and some pesos.   I tried to buy an illegal alien pinata, but the clerk was bumfuzzled by my traveler’s check and couldn’t take it.  There went all my efforts to bring back some aliens.

I had a nice chat with an American native who was telling me how nothing would grow in the gardens there in the Big Bend this year.  It was much too dry.   He has a bunch of family on the other side of the river, but they’re called illegal when they visit on this side.

The drive from Presidio, TX, to Terlingua, TX is almost 70 miles, along the Rio Grande River.  The scenes in these pictures that I took are what it looks like.   Anyone who wants a border fence to keep out – or in – illegals may want to start putting aside some of their own cash to finance it.

Fence this:

This is a view of Mexico from the road that runs into Del Rio, TX, those hills in the distance are illegal alien country – across the Rio Grande that separates this country from the other side of the river, and Ciudad Acuna.  Now, let’s talk about deficits and Border Fences.

Fences are not about ‘creeps’ to be kept out; for those of character like poet Robert Frost, they even may make good neighbors.