Over Easy

(Picture courtesy of mhaithaca at flickr.com.)

Thursdays the foreign media and news emphasis begun by Southern Dragon, that tradition Over Easy is continuation of, is the main feature that I follow. This past week North Korea’s new leader kept  on with his continuing defiance of the west. He closed off a shared industrial zone to South Korean workers, and ramped up hostilities. The U.S. sent off antimissile weaponry to Guam.

North Korea appears to have moved a medium range missile capable of hitting targets in South Korea and Japan to its east coast, the South’s Yonhap news agency reported today.

The movement was detected by both South Korean and US intelligence, Yonhap said, citing military and government sources.

Today the prospects of opening new realms of discovery is the aim of improvements and enhancements to the abilities of the Hadron Collider. Particle physics is the intended recipient of this upgrade, but many other realms stand to gain from the work.

Scientists believe the upgrade will enable them to discover new particles which will lead to a more complete theory of how the Universe works.

A project leader with the LHC’s Atlas experiment, Dr Pippa Wells, told BBC News that there was much more to come from the LHC.

“The past two years have been the most exciting in my time as a particle physicist. People are absolutely fired up. They’ve made one new discovery (the Higgs) and they want to make more discoveries with the new high energies that the upgrade will give us. We could find a new realm of particle physics.”

Feminism as another tool of elites, instead of international issues about working women’s subjugation, concerns watchers of a struggle between prominent authors Slaughter and Sandberg – who direct attention to high level executives.

Figures show, for example, that in 2009, 27.5 percent of African-American women, 27.4 percent of Hispanic women and 13.5 percent of white women in the US were living below the poverty line. Moreover, 35.1 percent of households headed by single moms were food insecure at some point in 2010, meaning that they did not have enough food at all times for an active, healthy life.

Many working mothers in the US are working double shifts, night shifts or two to three jobs just in order to provide for their families.

Given these blatant class and race-biases, there is something profoundly illiberal – and fundamentally incongruous – in the re-envisioning of liberated womanhood as a reorientation of affect and as a better balancing act. US women do not need to change their attitude; they need, first, job security, good childcare, livable wages for the work they do, and physical security.

Agriculture that incorporates biologically engineered crops was promoted by a recent conference in Egypt. Shortly before the conference convened, reports that the country had destroyed unauthorized genetically altered plantings were contradicted by figures on the existence of 1,000 hectares of genetically modified maise there. Controversy developed that the conference tried to refute.

Another potential threat is the impact of genetically modified crops on biodiversity. Biotech companies flood the market with uniform seeds, devoid of previous traits that made them adaptable to specific soils and environments. By being uniform, crops become much more vulnerable to disease.

Last but not least, some studies have suggested that genetically engineered foods are not safe for consumers, arguing that they did not undergo long-term safety assessments before being introduced to the US market and the rest of the world.

Various experiments on lab rats conducted in Egypt and abroad to evaluate the rats’ physiological reactions to a diet of genetically modified crops reached the same conclusions. These rodents had reproductive problems, weaker immune systems, accelerating aging, high cholesterol, organ damage and gastrointestinal problems.

In preparation for withdrawal of large portions of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, ‘expeditionary’ conditions will be returned for occupation troops there. Lobster is expected to go missing from menus where they have been provided for purposes of MWR (morale, welfare and recreation).

Among the other things to go in the shift to expeditionary living will be franchises such as Popeye’s at Bagram airbase and TGIF at Kandahar. The PX shops for soldiers will also shrink, cutting back on stocks of goods including computers and high-end sunglasses to concentrate on toiletries and necessities.

“Franchise food, coffee and merchandise vendors will also close when expeditionary standards are implemented,” Hawk said. “There will be less MWR-led events.”

Medical services will not be affected, so anyone injured in battlefield can be taken to top-level hospitals within the “golden hour” vital for saving lives. And wireless internet will be switched on until bases close, allowing soldiers to stay in touch with friends and families back home.

The End is Near is good news in this respect, that the wars begun by criminal misconduct in the previous administration are finally being ended. Never.Give.Up.