Art of Mondrian

(Picture courtesy of eston at flickr.com.)

The art of Piet Mondrian can be compared to design, as his ideas were at the forefront of his creations, more than natural composition.

 He evolved a non-representational form which he termed neoplasticism. This consisted of white ground, upon which was painted a grid of vertical and horizontal black lines and the three primary colors.[1]

(snip)

Although the result leads the viewer to begin emphasizing the forms over the content, these paintings are still firmly rooted in nature; and it is only the knowledge of Mondrian’s later achievements that leads one to search for the roots of his future abstraction in these works.

Mondrian’s art always was intimately related to his spiritual and philosophical studies. In 1908, he became interested in the theosophical movement launched byHelena Petrovna Blavatsky in the late 19th century; and, in 1909, he joined the Dutch branch of the Theosophical Society. The work of Blavatsky and a parallel spiritual movement, Rudolf Steiner‘s Anthroposophy, significantly affected the further development of his aesthetic.[7] Blavatsky believed that it was possible to attain a more profound knowledge of nature than that provided by empiricalmeans, and much of Mondrian’s work for the rest of his life was inspired by his search for that spiritual knowledge.

Mondrian is seen often represented in block work presented in designs of everyday objects, his influence found in many forms.

(Picture courtesy of antonio campoy at flickr.com.)

Art of Mondrian