Over Easy

In tribute to Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner, the Over Easy community gathers to discuss news of the day of a morning.

Militia that had kidnapped Libyan Prime Minister Zeidan released him this morning.

The militia, which had been hired by the government to provide security in Tripoli, said it “arrested” Zeidan after US Secretary of State John Kerry said Libya had a role in the weekend capture in the city of Abu Anas al-Liby.

Potential victims of global economic crisis are gulping nervously about U.S. radicals’ antics.

“The effects of any failure to repay the debt would be felt right away, leading to potentially major disruptions in financial markets,” IMF’s chief economist Olivier Blanchardsaid in a press briefing. “It could well be that what is now a (U.S.) recovery would turn into a recession or even worse.”

Advances made in treatment of alzheimers, at the Medical Research Council Toxicology Unit, based at the University of Leicester, are hailed as a turning point, treating the mechanisms that overprotect affected material by shutting down.

“What’s really exciting is a compound has completely prevented neurodegeneration and that’s a first.

“This isn’t the compound you would use in people, but it means we can do it and it’s a start.”

The teacher strike in Rio de Janeiro erupted in violence as teachers hold out for better pay and treatment, and better allocation of national resources.

After the million-strong protests three months ago, the president, Dilma Rousseff, tried to assuage public anger with a promise to divert more revenue to education and health.

But scepticism remains. Brazil spends a similar amount of its GDP on education as the UK, but the returns on this public investment are poor. With short school hours, high truancy rates and comparatively poor academic results, many suspect the system is mired in corruption and excessive bureaucracy.

In Rio, the teachers’ union says the mayor’s pay offer is too low. Many feel that the public education system is failing the nation and needs major reform. They have been on strike for 46 days.

Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad has allowed U.N. weapons inspectors begin destruction of chemical weapons there, and has won praise from those wanting peace actually to break out. Mine, too. This would be a good way to begin letting the nation get back from the precipice of self-destruction.

The destruction comes in the wake of gruesome Aug. 21 chemical attack in Damascus, which the United States and rebel leaders said killed over a thousand civilans, including hundreds of children.

Never.Give.Up.