Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

The planet is increasingly hazardous to defend, as the interests against it gain market share and invidious tactics. Hundreds have died in their fight to save all of us, and the planet we are living on. Land rights are growing in fatal events in disputes, and indigenous populations very vulnerable.

‘There can be few starker or more obvious symptoms of the global environmental crisis than a dramatic upturn in the killings of ordinary people defending rights to their land or environment,’ said Oliver Courtney, a senior campaigner for Global Witness.

‘This rapidly worsening problem is going largely unnoticed, and those responsible almost always get away with it,’ Courtney said.

The report’s release followed a dire warning by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which said global warming is driving humanity toward unprecedented risk due to factors such as food and water insecurity. Global Witness said this puts environmental activists in more danger than ever before.

A controversial report has concluded that an immense waste of money on supplying Tamiflu to prevent and control flu outbreaks may have been all gained in our health efforts.

The Cochrane Collaboration claimed the drug did not prevent the spread of flu or reduce dangerous complications, and only slightly helped symptoms.

The manufacturers Roche and other experts say the analysis is flawed.

Barry Clinch from Roche said Tamiflu had been approved by 100 regulators around the world.

The antiviral drug Tamiflu was stockpiled from 2006 in the UK when some agencies were predicting that a pandemic of bird flu could kill up to 750,000 people in Britain. Similar decisions were made in other countries.

The Kiev government launched an offense against military incursions the Russian government styles as local defense, the west describes as invasion, in the confusion of Eastern Ukrainian contests for control.  Ukrainian soldiers in the advance have been observed to remove firing pins to show nonviolent intent.

Andrey Parubiy, head of Ukraine’s National Security and Defense Council, announced the first battalion of a National Guard ‘comprised of volunteers from Maidan self-defense troops,’ has left Kiev for the south-east.

Russia has warned that if Kiev uses force against anti-Maidan protests in eastern Ukraine, this would undermine the effort to convene a four-party conference on resolving the crisis in the country, which would include the US, the EU, Russia and Ukraine.

Turchinov also proposed conducting a joint operation with UN peacekeeping forces, a decision that was strongly condemned by Russian FM Sergey Lavrov at a Beijing press conference on Tuesday as ‘totally unacceptable.’

A bright spot in the Middle East, Tunisia continues to evolve out of its former autocratic model into a more popular front. Problems are churning, but positive efforts continue to dominate the entirety. The revolution has put into power diverse elements that are working together.  Sympathetic observation finds the Tunisian workers seeking to benefit from a better economy still under stress in the recovery.

Since 2011 there has been no deviation from course: integrating Tunisia into the international division of labour by offering foreign investors a skilled workforce and miserable wage levels. This model can only perpetuate the huge regional inequalities.

(snip)

On the repayment of the foreign debt incurred by Ben Ali and in part siphoned off by members of his clan, Caid Essebsi told me: ‘People talk about the debt, but it isn’t catastrophic, since it’s under 50%. Other countries such as France have a ratio of 85%’ (7). He added quickly that ‘a country with self-respect pays its debts, whoever’s in power. Since independence, Tunisia has never reneged on its debt.’ This is what Ghannouchi told me the day before: ‘Tunisia has a longstanding record of honouring its debts. We shall abide by it.’

Never.Give.Up.