Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

Hope you will celebrate Juneteenth;

Juneteenth is an annual observance on June 19 to remember when Union soldiers enforced the Emancipation Proclamation and freed all remaining slaves in Texas on June 19, 1865. This day is an opportunity for people to celebrate freedom and equal rights in the United States.

Congratulations, the Halifax Examiner has arrived, featuring the newly emancipated in-depth reporting of award-winning journalist Tim Bousquet, whose exposés of Halifax corruption included the comedic efforts of the city council there to attract the attention of media and businesses.
The province got ready for the G7 by hiring Bristol Communications for $270,000 ‘to market Nova Scotia as a world-class venue during the summit,’ reported the Daily News.

No one then, or since, has defined ‘world-class city.’ It’s just understood to be a good thing, like ‘proactive’ in the ’80s, ‘sustainable’ in the aughts, ‘innovation’ in the current decade—substance-less bureaucratic lingo. Among the ignorant managerial classes, the person who masters bullshit is considered smart.

But whatever ‘world-class city’ meant, it probably didn’t mean a place that had raw sewage and associated ‘floatables’ lapping against the bulkheads along the waterfront where G7 delegates and the international press corps were meeting.

The top security official in the U.K. has issued the opinion under which communication on the internet is deemed ‘external’ and can therefore be routinely monitored by government.

Under Ripa, traditional interception of ‘internal’ communications within the UK requires an individual warrant. Farr argues that in a technologically-fast moving world, where the greatest threat to national security is from ‘militant Islamist terrorists’ operating both abroad and in the UK, identifying individual targets before monitoring starts is too difficult. Those deemed to be “external” can be monitored without an individual warrant.

Farr says: ‘Any regime that … only permitted interception in relation to specific persons or premises, would not have allowed adequate levels of intelligence information to be obtained and would not have met the undoubted requirements of intelligence for the protection of national security.’

Iraqi PM Maliki fired top officers for their failure to resist rebel advances, and those not directly involved in military operations were forbidden to bear arms. The Iraqi government requested U.S. air strikes against the rebel force ISIL, as fighting threatened to disrupt any functioning national operation there. Congressional opponents insist the U.S. President will proceed in Iraq without their approval.

General Martin Dempsey, the top US military commander, shortly confirmed the request during a Senate Appropriations Defencse Subcommittee hearing.

‘We have a request from the Iraqi government for air power,’ said Dempsey.

(snip)

In Salaheddin province, the rebels seized three villages, Albu Hassan, Birwajli and Bastamli, in northern Iraq on Wednesday during clashes with Iraq’s security forces and residents.

The fighting left at least 20 civilians dead, Shallal Abdul Baban, a local official, said on Wednesday.

Later on Wednesday, the United Arab Emitates recalled its envoy from Iraq and slammed ‘sectarian’ policies. Saudi Arabia warned Iraq was heading for civil war.

Argentina’s market unraveled under the fear of losing any standing in the world financial community after the U.S. Supreme Court refused an appeal of lower court rulings that gave creditors the power to demand payment in full of debt bought during crisis.

Economy Minister Axel Kicillof has announced that the government plans to reopen the debt swap program in the hope of renegotiating bonds held by hedge funds, after the US Supreme Court declined to take Argentina’s case against the so-called ‘vulture funds’.

The official spoke today in a press conference to communicate the government’s position on the yesterday’s ruling in the US Supreme Court. The ‘vulture funds’ are investors who refused to enter previous debt swaps, and are using the New York court system to demand full payment of bonds acquired after the 2001 default.

Kicillof told a press conference convened in the Economy ministry that the Cristina Fernández de Kirchner administration would take the necessary steps for ‘a new debt swap under Argentine legislation.’

Never.Give.Up.