Welcome to Summer, we are now officially over the solstice that begins our summer.

A 1996 UK Royal Mail stamp card with a cartoon by Charles Barsotti

(Picture courtesy of Mark Anderson.)

A distinguished member of The New Yorker cartoonist hall of fame, known for outstanding work in portraying our society, passed away this last week. Charles Barsotti drew remarkable humorous portrayals of our lives during his career from the 1960′s until last week, when his last cartoon was published.

He was a signature artist whose rounded, elegant, sparsely detailed style evoked both the traditional world of a James Thurber and the contemporary sensibility of a Roz Chast.

Barsotti’s work features a simple repertory including a nameless, lovable pooch and a monarch whose kingdom consists of a guard and a telephone.

He was originally from San Antonio, TX. The New Yorker published a commemorative collection of some of his cartoons when he died, noting “With the minimum number of lines, Charlie could extract the maximum number of ideas.”

The obviously more simple style of Barsotti contrasts with the previous cartoon artists I’ve featured here, Herblock and Mauldin. The content of his humor also is markedly different, the personal introspection rather than commentary on society, the national scene and politics. As with any artistic preferences, your feelings and mine are a matter of personal taste and I can only hope that you get enjoyment from each in some way.

 

(Picture courtesy of Mark Anderson.)

A 1996 UK Royal Mail stamp card with a cartoon by Charles Barsotti

 

A 1996 UK Royal Mail stamp card with a cartoon by Charles Barsotti