Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

International protests opposing sentences given to al Jazeera correspondents in Egypt for their reports that displeased the government came to the U.N. headquarters in New York yesterday.

Three empty chairs sat at the front of the ‘FreeAJStaff’ meeting as a symbolic gesture. The names of each of the jailed journalists were placed on the seats.

The United Nations Correspondents Association (UNCA) hosted the event in an effort to underscore the journalists’ plight and discuss ways to secure their release.

‘Everyone has the right of freedom of opinion and expression,’ Pamela Falk, president of UNCA, said at the meeting. ‘Freedom of the press is not an option — it is an inherent right.’

UNCA has asked Egypt to live up to its international commitments and free all detained journalists. The right to report news is enshrined in international human rights law, and Falk said the U.N. is working to insert language in all conflict and peacekeeping resolutions to protect journalists.

Great Britain is running out of land, with a potential shortage of 2 million hectares anticipated by 2030. Agriculture has been a staple use of the countryside.

The report, from the University of Cambridge, says the growing population plus the use of land for energy crops are contributing to the gap.

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With a population expected to exceed 70 million by 2030, the extra demand for living space and food will have a major impact on the way land is used, the report says.

On top of these pressures, the government is committed to using bioenergy crops such as miscanthus as renewable sources of energy, further limiting the stock of land for food.

‘That is putting some very significant future pressures on how we use our land,’ said Andrew Montague-Fuller, the report’s lead author.

Chilean president Bachelet announced a plan to buy and return land to indigenous communities in an effort to integrate them into the country.

Chile’s indigenous peoples, which include the Mapuche, Aymara and Diaguita, have an underweight representation in Congress and often face a harsh economic reality in what is otherwise one of Latin America’s wealthiest countries.

Years of conflict over land claims have increasingly flared into violence between the Mapuche, the largest indigenous group, and local farmers, forestry companies and police, putting pressure on the government to act.

‘It has been nearly 25 years since we got back our democracy,’ Bachelet said at the presidential palace in Santiago, flanked by representatives of indigenous communities.

‘It is time to have the courage to take new steps with a view not to the short-term, but rather the (long-term) development that has been so difficult to obtain for our indigenous sisters and brothers.’

Never.Give.Up.