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Over Easy

3:44 am in Culture, Government, Media, Politics by Ruth Calvo

Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

Another anniversary of September 11th, originally Patriot Day after the date of the Battle of Lexington and Concord,  occurs today, with the hope that further atrocities can be avoided.

In the Pretorius trial, the Judge has delivered this opinion; ‘In the charge of premeditated murder, the evidence is purely circumstantial, the judge says.’  The finding is error, not intentional homicide.   Final verdict has not yet been announced as of this time.

“How could the accused have reasonably foreseen the shot he fired would have killed the deceased? Clearly he did not subjectively foresee this, that he would have killed the person behind the door, let alone the deceased,” says Judge Masipa…The only two remaining charges are either culpable homicide or acquittal.

Reports of al Jazeera insistence that the beheading of U.S. journalists was staged and provided the basis for U.S. intervention appeared in other media from the area, criticizing the report’s accuracy and sensitivity.

“Perhaps the first thing that draws the attention of the viewer” in the first beheading video is that “Foley was playing the role of champion not the victim only, for he recites a lengthy statement in peerless theatrical performance, and it seems from tracking the movement of his eyes that he was reading a text from an autocue,” the Al Jazeera report said.

The report even expressed doubts over the identity of the masked killer, saying: “he does not have the features of common jihadist figures, but he was rather similar to a Hollywood actor.”

Muslim groups called for a meeting to organize against the ISIS killings and their self-proclaimed. association with Islam.  Maha Akeel of the Saudi-based Organization of the Islamic Conference pointed out that the killings have nothing to do with the Muslim religion.

“We can’t call them an Islamic group, but a criminal one,” she explained, emphasizing Al-Azhar’s online campaign, which urges people and news outlets to stop calling ISIS Islamic.

A go-slow demonstration by leading internet firms was started Wednesday to show the effects of an end that is threatened to net neutrality.

Tech firms including Netflix, Etsy, FourSquare, KickStarter, Mozilla, Reddit, PornHub and Vimeo installed a widget on their sites to show how they believe the internet would look if the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) overturns “net neutrality” rules.

The FCC has been forced to rewrite its rules on governing the internet after a series of court defeats at the hands of cable and telecom companies. Wednesday’s protests are against one proposal that would allow cable firms to create “fast lanes” for paying customers who use a lot of bandwidth. Critics charge that move would end net neutrality – the concept that the internet is a level playing field and internet service providers can not discriminate against any individual, organisation or company.

Rights groups urged Gambian President Jammeh to reject proposed law to further criminalize homosexuality by making continuing gay behavior subject to imprisonment and establishing a new charge of “aggravated homosexuality” targeting repeat offenders.

“Gambia’s national assembly and the president should not endorse state-sponsored homophobia,” said Stephen Cockburn, Amnesty International’s deputy regional director for west and central Africa.

He described the proposal as a “profoundly damaging act that violates international human rights law.”

But Jammeh, a former military officer who seized power in a 1994 coup, has shown few signs of bowing to pressure on Gambia’s anti-gay laws in the past. He has repeatedly denounced homosexuality and once vowed to behead gays, although he later retracted the threat.

Never.Give.Up.

Over Easy

3:52 am in Culture, Government, Media, Politics by Ruth Calvo

Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

The OECD has issued a report that shows continuing economic distress in advanced countries that will not diminish until job creation becomes a priority.

In its employment outlook for 2014, the Paris-based think tank predicted the rate of joblessness in member nations — a grouping of developed economies including much of Europe and the U.S. — would likely tick down over the next 18 months from 7.4 percent to 7.1 percent by the end of 2015. But even so, the lasting effects of the global financial meltdown of nearly six years ago are still being felt. “Almost 45 million people are out of work in OECD countries, 12.1 million more than just before the crisis,” the report noted.

But Stefano Scarpetta, the OECD Director for Employment, Labor and Social Affairs, pointed out that there remained “sharp differences” across member countries in their unemployment rates. For example, he pointed to the 6.2 percent unemployment rate in the U.S. recorded in July this year — the lowest level since September 2008 — and a 3.7 percent unemployment rate in Japan.

The report said that among OECD members, 16.3 million people — more than one in three of all unemployed — have been out of work for 12 months or more in the first quarter of 2014. That number, the report said, was almost twice what it was in 2007.

“Long-term unemployment has probably peaked in most countries, but it remains a major source of concern,” Scarpetta wrote in an editorial accompanying the report. “For countries that saw the biggest increases, there is growing evidence that part of what was originally a cyclical increase in unemployment has become structural and will thus be more difficult to reverse during the economic recovery.”

As peace talks began involving the Ukraine, as NATO convened in Wales,  the announced ceasefire failed to take hold and fighting continued. France’s decision to delay delivery of a contracted Mistral military ship to Russia threatens to cost that country a high price.

Vladimir Putin on Wednesday issued a seven-point peace plan for eastern Ukraine, hours after his Ukrainian counterpart said there was an agreement for a “permanent ceasefire” for the region.

But in a day of confusing mixed messages, Arseny Yatsenyuk, Ukraine’s prime minister, dismissed the peace plan, which Putin had apparently jotted down on a flight to Mongolia, calling it a trap.

On the ground there was no sign of a ceasefire. Clashes continued as both rebels and Ukrainian volunteers said they would continue fighting.

Interpol and Europol’s combined efforts have shown international food crimes are reaching an unprecedented level of occurrence.

The review of Britain’s food supply chains was announced in response to the horsemeat fraud in 2013.

Michael Ellis, assistant director of Interpol, told BBC News: “This has changed the scope of investigations. Criminals have realised that they can make the same amount of money by dealing with counterfeit food. Invariably the sentences are much lighter.

“In my experience, the patterns used by criminals involved in counterfeiting are very similar to those used in the dealing of drugs. They operate front companies, they employ front bank accounts, they will have false declarations for the movement of their goods, they will mis-declare their shipments.”

Never.Give.Up.

Over Easy

3:54 am in Foreign Policy, Government, Media, Politics by Ruth Calvo

Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch joined in a call for Israel to allow investigators into Gaza as deaths soared and charges multiplied of abuses there.

‘The Israeli authorities appear to have been playing bureaucratic games with us over access to Gaza, conditioning it on entirely unreasonable criteria even as the death toll mounts,’ Anne FitzGerald, Amnesty International’s director of Research and Crisis Response, said in the release.

At least 2,000 Palestinians, mostly civilians, have been killed since Israel launched Operation Protective Edge on July 7. Over 10,000 Gazans have been injured and half a million internally displaced. On the Israeli side, 64 soldiers have died in combat and three civilians have been killed by rocket attacks on Israeli cities. Both sides have been accused of violating the laws of war during the most deadly conflict between Israel and the occupied Gaza Strip since Hamas took power in 2007.

The rights groups said they want to send researchers into the territory to assess competing claims, and that Israel should not interfere with such independent investigations.

Journalist James Foley was beheaded in video released Wednesday, at the hands of a member of the militant group who spoke in the filmed event and is described by UK Foreign Secretary Hammond, who says he ‘appears to be British.’ Bombing of ISIS locations at Mosul dam continued yesterday.

Unconfirmed video and pictures of the photojournalist’s heartbreaking final moments emerged this morning via Twitter accounts claiming to be associated with the Islamic State, previously known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

In what looked like a prepared statement, Foley called on his family to rise up against the US, who he calls his ‘real killers.’

‘I call on my friends, family, and loved ones to rise up against my real killers, the US government, for what will happen to me is only a result of their complacency and criminality,’ he said.

A failure of a U.S. mission to free the hostages was announced yesterday; ‘The U.S. military launched a secret mission this summer to rescue a number of Americans held captive in Syria by the Islamic State but failed to find them, senior Obama administration officials said Wednesday night.’

Comprehensive studies have been completed on Neanderthal remains that have given a picture of the primitive man coexisting with modern men for almost 5,000 years. Kit seems to have used this in his overnight post, as well, but you may have missed that, so I wanted to throw it in here so we can contemplate the ancient legends that might have been caused by coexisting with species different from the now dominant one.

Now an international team of researchers collected more than 400 samples from the most important sites in Europe. The samples were purified and analysed using state-of-the-art dating methods at Oxford University.

The results provide the clearest insight yet into the interaction between our ancestors and Neanderthals, when they first encountered each other and why the Neanderthals went extinct, according to the lead researcher, Prof Thomas Higham of the University of Oxford.

‘I think we can set aside the idea of a rapid extinction of Neanderthals caused solely by the arrival of modern humans. Instead we can see a more complex process in which there is a much longer overlap between the two populations where there could have been exchanges of ideas and culture.’

Four McDonalds restaurants have been shut down in Moscow in the name of consumer protection. Several are under ongoing investigation as well, in a burgeoning competition in sanctions.

‘Multiple violations of sanitary norms were detected in the sourcing of food and waste disposal in McDonald’s restaurants during inspections carried out between the 18th and 20th of August,’ said an official statement from the watchdog, Rospotrebnadzor.

The company has said that it will study the allegations against its franchises, and ‘will do everything to ensure that the restaurants open as soon as possible.’

‘McDonald’s main priority is offering its customers quality and safe produce,’ said a statement on the McDonald’s website.

Those golden arches will make an interesting addition to Putin’s trophy case, along with admirer Sarah Palin and the bears.

Never.Give.Up.

Things that go Stomp in the night

(Picture courtesy of Peachland Joe at flickr.com.)

Over Easy

3:53 am in Culture, Foreign Policy, Government, Media by Ruth Calvo

Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

Despite rocket fire that broke a 72 hour ceasefire, all sides agreed to an extension proposed to last for five more days of truce and peace talks in embattled Gaza.

Hamas, the Islamist organisation in power in Gaza, denied they had launched rockets, however, and shortly before midnight Palestinian delegates in Cairo announced the extension.

‘There will be a five-day ceasefire to give more opportunity for negotiation,’ Gamal Shobky, the Palestinian ambassador in Cairo, told the Guardian. ‘We are very close but there are still some things to resolve.’

The news will be welcomed in Gaza, battered by a month-long conflict which inflicted massive damage on infrastructure and housing, as well as killing nearly 2,000 people, mostly civilians. Sixty four Israeli soldiers died, and three civilians in Israel were killed by rocket fire.

As Mt. Sinjar emptied of persecuted minorities chased there by ISIS, the international community sought to change premiers as one step toward less volatile conditions.

The White House on Wednesday urged Iraqi leader Nuri al-Maliki to step aside and allow the man nominated to become his successor as prime minister to form a government.

‘He needs to respect that process,’ Rhodes told reporters. ‘This is what the Iraqis themselves have decided to do.’

President Barack Obama on Monday threw his weight behind the choice of Haidar al-Abadi to form a new government, appealing to Maliki, without directly naming him, to peacefully turn over power.

‘The White House will be very glad to see a new government in place with prime minister Abadi at the lead of that government,’ Rhodes said.

Mexico awarded 83% of its oil resources to national oil firm Pemex as a move toward reorganization and revitalization of its energy industry, enabled by an amendment to the constitution which required state ownership of resources.

Mexico enacted new rules this week to open up the country’s energy sector.

Private oil companies are now allowed to operate in the country for the first time in 76 years.

The next round of bidding will see private oil firms vie for the remaining 79% of possible reserves.

(snip)

The hope is that the changes in the energy sector will boost production back to 2004 levels by 2025.

Crumbling infrastructure, bureaucracy and corruption have pared Mexican production from 3.6 million barrels a day in 2004 to just 2.5 million.

The first woman to be awarded the Fields Medal, mathematics’ equivalent of the Nobel, is an Iranian professor at Stanford, Maryam Mirzakhani, awarded the medal for her work in understanding the symmetry of curved surfaces.

‘This is a great honor. I will be happy if it encourages young female scientists and mathematicians,’ Mirzakhani was quoted as saying on Stanford’s website.

‘I am sure there will be many more women winning this kind of award in coming years,’ she said.

Mirzakhani, 37, was born in Tehran and lived there until she began her doctorate work at Harvard University. She said she dreamed of becoming a writer when she was young, but she pursued her love of solving mathematical problems.

‘It is fun. It’s like solving a puzzle or connecting the dots in a detective case. I felt that this was something I could do, and I wanted to pursue this path.’ she said.

Never.Give.Up.

Over Easy

3:30 am in Culture, Government, Media, Politics by Ruth Calvo

Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

European efforts to land a craft on a comet will come to fruition soon, as Rosetta descends to the duck-shaped comet as its target after a journey of ten years’ length.

More than 249 million miles from where it was launched in March 2004, the spacecraft Rosetta will finally meet up with its target, Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

To get there, Rosetta has had to make four flybys of Mars and Earth, using their gravitational force as a slingshot to build up speed, and then entering a 31-month hibernation as light from the distant Sun became too weak for its solar panels.

It was awakened in January.

After braking maneuvers, the three-ton craft should on Wednesday be about 62 miles from the comet — a navigational feat that, if all goes well, will be followed by glittering scientific rewards.

The departure of one of Great Britain’s highest placed female political leaders put another light on Cameron’s handling of conflict in Gaza.

Lady Warsi said the prime minister had lost moral authority, undermined the national interest and deprived Britain of its historic role as an honest broker in the Middle East by refusing to condemn the aggressive Israeli response to the Hamas rocket attacks as disproportionate.

In her strongly worded resignation letter, whose morning publication came as a surprise to No 10, Warsi warned that ‘our approach and language during the current crisis in Gaza is morally indefensible [and] is not in Britain’s national interest.’

She also complained that Cameron’s response may become ‘a basis for radicalisation [which] could have consequences for us for years to come.’

Her departure came after internal argument inside the National Security Council over Cameron’s refusal to condemn the aggressive Israeli response to the Hamas rocket attacks.

Leader of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo Carlotto in Argentina received news that her long missing grandson has been located and they are to be reunited. The child was taken from his family during the regime of the last military dictatorship, his parents murdered.

‘I will not force the situation,’ Carlotto said when asked about the long-expected meeting with Guido. ‘The meeting will take place whenever he decides so, at Grandmother’s headquarters where all these reunions take place.’

Carlotto explained she never met Guido’s father but that her husband had met him. She said she is open to meet her that part of his grandson’s biological family.

Grandmothers’ president also referred to the family that raised her grandson. ‘We do not know much. We know that they lived in the countryside. They must have raised him well. They were farmworkers,’ she said.

Never.Give.Up.

Over Easy

3:19 am in Foreign Policy, Government, Media by Ruth Calvo

Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

Two Palestinian journalists were killed in attacks on Gaza during the recent bombardment, bringing to eight the number of journalists who have lost their lives in these events.

According to an affiliate of the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ), the Palestinian Journalists’ Syndicate (PJS), the two journalists were killed in the artillery shelling of Shojayah market. A third journalist was seriously injured.

The two who died were Sameh Al-Aryan, 26, of Al-Aqsa TV, and photojournalist Rami Rayan, 25, who worked for the Palestinian Media Network. Photojournalist Hamed Shobaky, of Manara Media, was severely wounded in the same incident.

Ahed Zaqout, 49, a presenter on Palestine TV sport programmes, was killed in his apartment during an attack on the Italian tower in Gaza City.

Jim Boumelha, the IFJ president, said: ‘We express our anger and condemnation at the killing of these journalists, the latest victims in this ongoing cycle of intimidation, violence and murder against media workers in Palestine.’

Dire results are predicted from Argentina’s debt default brought on by vulture creditors’ victories in court over their purchase of debt from that beleaguered country.

Argentina defaulted for the second time in 12 years after hopes for a midnight deal with holdout creditors were dashed, setting up stock and bond prices for declines on Thursday and raising chances a recession could worsen this year.

After a long legal battle with hedge funds that rejected Argentina’s debt restructuring following its 2002 default, Latin America’s third-biggest economy failed to strike a deal in time to meet a midnight deadline for a coupon payment on exchange bonds.

Even a short default will raise companies’ borrowing costs, pile more pressure on the peso, drain dwindling foreign reserves and fuel one of the world’s highest inflation rates.

Health emergency measures including quarantine are being put into effect in Sierra Leone as a result of the outbreak of the ebola virus there.

Ernest Bai Koroma said the epicentres of the outbreak in the east would be quarantined and asked the security forces to enforce the measures.

The UN says more than 670 people in West Africa have died of Ebola since February – 224 of them in Sierra Leone.

This includes Dr Sheik Umar Khan who led Sierra Leone’s fight against the virus. His funeral is on Thursday.

Never.Give.Up.

Over Easy

3:51 am in Culture, Government, Media, Politics by Ruth Calvo

Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

International protests opposing sentences given to al Jazeera correspondents in Egypt for their reports that displeased the government came to the U.N. headquarters in New York yesterday.

Three empty chairs sat at the front of the ‘FreeAJStaff’ meeting as a symbolic gesture. The names of each of the jailed journalists were placed on the seats.

The United Nations Correspondents Association (UNCA) hosted the event in an effort to underscore the journalists’ plight and discuss ways to secure their release.

‘Everyone has the right of freedom of opinion and expression,’ Pamela Falk, president of UNCA, said at the meeting. ‘Freedom of the press is not an option — it is an inherent right.’

UNCA has asked Egypt to live up to its international commitments and free all detained journalists. The right to report news is enshrined in international human rights law, and Falk said the U.N. is working to insert language in all conflict and peacekeeping resolutions to protect journalists.

Great Britain is running out of land, with a potential shortage of 2 million hectares anticipated by 2030. Agriculture has been a staple use of the countryside.

The report, from the University of Cambridge, says the growing population plus the use of land for energy crops are contributing to the gap.

(snip)\

With a population expected to exceed 70 million by 2030, the extra demand for living space and food will have a major impact on the way land is used, the report says.

On top of these pressures, the government is committed to using bioenergy crops such as miscanthus as renewable sources of energy, further limiting the stock of land for food.

‘That is putting some very significant future pressures on how we use our land,’ said Andrew Montague-Fuller, the report’s lead author.

Chilean president Bachelet announced a plan to buy and return land to indigenous communities in an effort to integrate them into the country.

Chile’s indigenous peoples, which include the Mapuche, Aymara and Diaguita, have an underweight representation in Congress and often face a harsh economic reality in what is otherwise one of Latin America’s wealthiest countries.

Years of conflict over land claims have increasingly flared into violence between the Mapuche, the largest indigenous group, and local farmers, forestry companies and police, putting pressure on the government to act.

‘It has been nearly 25 years since we got back our democracy,’ Bachelet said at the presidential palace in Santiago, flanked by representatives of indigenous communities.

‘It is time to have the courage to take new steps with a view not to the short-term, but rather the (long-term) development that has been so difficult to obtain for our indigenous sisters and brothers.’

Never.Give.Up.

Over Easy

3:40 am in Culture, Foreign Policy, Government, Media, Politics by Ruth Calvo

Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

Hope you will celebrate Juneteenth;

Juneteenth is an annual observance on June 19 to remember when Union soldiers enforced the Emancipation Proclamation and freed all remaining slaves in Texas on June 19, 1865. This day is an opportunity for people to celebrate freedom and equal rights in the United States.

Congratulations, the Halifax Examiner has arrived, featuring the newly emancipated in-depth reporting of award-winning journalist Tim Bousquet, whose exposés of Halifax corruption included the comedic efforts of the city council there to attract the attention of media and businesses.
The province got ready for the G7 by hiring Bristol Communications for $270,000 ‘to market Nova Scotia as a world-class venue during the summit,’ reported the Daily News.

No one then, or since, has defined ‘world-class city.’ It’s just understood to be a good thing, like ‘proactive’ in the ’80s, ‘sustainable’ in the aughts, ‘innovation’ in the current decade—substance-less bureaucratic lingo. Among the ignorant managerial classes, the person who masters bullshit is considered smart.

But whatever ‘world-class city’ meant, it probably didn’t mean a place that had raw sewage and associated ‘floatables’ lapping against the bulkheads along the waterfront where G7 delegates and the international press corps were meeting.

The top security official in the U.K. has issued the opinion under which communication on the internet is deemed ‘external’ and can therefore be routinely monitored by government.

Under Ripa, traditional interception of ‘internal’ communications within the UK requires an individual warrant. Farr argues that in a technologically-fast moving world, where the greatest threat to national security is from ‘militant Islamist terrorists’ operating both abroad and in the UK, identifying individual targets before monitoring starts is too difficult. Those deemed to be “external” can be monitored without an individual warrant.

Farr says: ‘Any regime that … only permitted interception in relation to specific persons or premises, would not have allowed adequate levels of intelligence information to be obtained and would not have met the undoubted requirements of intelligence for the protection of national security.’

Iraqi PM Maliki fired top officers for their failure to resist rebel advances, and those not directly involved in military operations were forbidden to bear arms. The Iraqi government requested U.S. air strikes against the rebel force ISIL, as fighting threatened to disrupt any functioning national operation there. Congressional opponents insist the U.S. President will proceed in Iraq without their approval.

General Martin Dempsey, the top US military commander, shortly confirmed the request during a Senate Appropriations Defencse Subcommittee hearing.

‘We have a request from the Iraqi government for air power,’ said Dempsey.

(snip)

In Salaheddin province, the rebels seized three villages, Albu Hassan, Birwajli and Bastamli, in northern Iraq on Wednesday during clashes with Iraq’s security forces and residents.

The fighting left at least 20 civilians dead, Shallal Abdul Baban, a local official, said on Wednesday.

Later on Wednesday, the United Arab Emitates recalled its envoy from Iraq and slammed ‘sectarian’ policies. Saudi Arabia warned Iraq was heading for civil war.

Argentina’s market unraveled under the fear of losing any standing in the world financial community after the U.S. Supreme Court refused an appeal of lower court rulings that gave creditors the power to demand payment in full of debt bought during crisis.

Economy Minister Axel Kicillof has announced that the government plans to reopen the debt swap program in the hope of renegotiating bonds held by hedge funds, after the US Supreme Court declined to take Argentina’s case against the so-called ‘vulture funds’.

The official spoke today in a press conference to communicate the government’s position on the yesterday’s ruling in the US Supreme Court. The ‘vulture funds’ are investors who refused to enter previous debt swaps, and are using the New York court system to demand full payment of bonds acquired after the 2001 default.

Kicillof told a press conference convened in the Economy ministry that the Cristina Fernández de Kirchner administration would take the necessary steps for ‘a new debt swap under Argentine legislation.’

Never.Give.Up.

Over Easy

3:54 am in Culture, Economy, Government, Media, Politics by Ruth Calvo

Over Easy

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today I will be putting the outside news up a day early.  Usually on Thursday, but today Wednesday, we will collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

This was mentioned by attaturk earlier, but worth pointing to for any later than wee hour readers:

Production of shrimp by major Thailand fishing concerns has been revealed to involve use of forced labor working under appalling conditions which has included the killing of workers as well as beatings and grueling long hours.   Shrimp from these concerns are sold to the world’s top four global retailers: Walmart, Carrefour, Costco and Tesco.

The investigation found that the world’s largest prawn farmer, the Thailand-based Charoen Pokphand (CP) Foods, buys fishmeal, which it feeds to its farmed prawns, from some suppliers that own, operate or buy from fishing boats manned with slaves.

(snip)CP Foods – a company with an annual turnover of $33bn (£20bn) that brands itself as ‘the kitchen of the world’ – sells its own-brand prawn feed to other farms, and supplies international supermarkets, as well as food manufacturers and food retailers, with frozen or cooked prawns and ready-made meals. It also sells raw prawn materials for food distributors.

In addition to Walmart, Carrefour, Costco and Tesco, the Guardian has identified AldiMorrisons, the Co-operative and Iceland as customers of CP Foods. They all sell frozen or cooked prawns, or ready meals such as prawn stir fry, supplied by CP Foods and its subsidiaries. CP Foods admits that slave labour is part of its supply chain.

‘We’re not here to defend what is going on,’ said Bob Miller, CP Foods’ UK managing director. ‘We know there’s issues with regard to the [raw] material that comes in [to port], but to what extent that is, we just don’t have visibility.’

You can help in the rejection of slavery by asking how shrimp is produced at stores you frequent, and by telling management at your markets of choice that you will not buy products produced by such methods, and avoiding the shrimps from CP Foods.

Discussions involving proposed Basic Income Guarantee (BIG) are surfacing in many groups, with an underlying concept that if the general population had the means to live at a very elemental level, there would be no need for social services and avoid abuses.

One alternative proposal is the Jobs Guarantee (JG) program. The idea behind the JG is that the government guarantees everyone who is willing and able to work a job at a fixed wage. The government then invites charities and nonprofits to sign on to the program and offer citizens work on neighborhood projects and others that are judged to be beneficial to the community as a whole. The JG has been successfully implemented in countries such as Argentina in the past on a somewhat limited basis.

Never.Give.Up.

Over Easy

3:44 am in Culture, Environment, Government, Media, Politics by Ruth Calvo

Please help keep FDL online, contribute to pay the techies who’ve been salvaging us from the constant DDoS attacks.

Argentina’s legal efforts to escape from ‘vulture creditors’ continues in the courts.

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

Argentina has entered into a payback plan to satisfy international creditors after its default in 2005, which has been heralded as its way to return to the financing denied it during the workout of debt. Agreement reached with The Paris Club has garnered international approval and advanced Argentina’s return to access to international financial sources. The nation’s legal efforts to escape from ‘vulture creditors’ continues in the courts, and is scheduled to be taken up, or denied, by the U.S. Supreme Court on June 12.

‘We do not believe that external debt is bad per se. It is good when taken to finance infrastructure project that allow the country to grow and it is bad when used for gambling,’ Álvarez explained.

‘Argentina pays up as long as the payment conditions are sustainable for the country,’ he asserted, adding that ‘”the vulture funds” business is all about gambling.’

The Argentine government is fighting a decisive battle in the US courts, due to the fact that a favourable ruling would mark a new victory on the road to ending the default status decreed during Adolfo Rodríguez Saá’s short presidency in December 2001.

On May 25, the country made their final presentation to the US Supreme Court, in which it was requested that rulings from lower courts in favour of the ‘Vulture Funds’ be revised.

The most positive outcome for Argentina would occur if the tribunal accepts the case and considers that the lower courts wrongly interpreted the concept of pari passu, which ensures that the country must treat all creditors equally.

Great Britain’s head of a new site, funded by the government to provide security advice to internet users, apologized after the site crashed shortly after it was launched, under unanticipated heavy traffic.

Get Safe Online was publicised as being the place to go for advice to protect computers against a high-profile hack.

But within moments of an announcement on Monday, the website collapsed under a deluge of visitors.

(snip)

‘There is no reason to say this is a DDoS [distributed denial of service] attack. I’d love to say it was an attack – but it’s just the total amount of traffic that’s coming in.’

A day after announcement by the U.S. of 30% goal in cutting air pollution from coal burning plants, China announced the start of efforts to cut its industrial pollution output.

China said Tuesday it will set an absolute cap on its CO2 emissions starting in 2016 — a potentially landmark move that, coupled with an earlier U.S. announcement on power plant emission curbs, could boost sluggish United Nations efforts to produce a new global climate accord.

The exact extent of the cuts was not announced, but officials said renewable energy would account for up to 25 percent of the country’s energy production and nuclear power would be ramped up by the end of the next decade.

‘The Chinese announcement marks potentially the most important turning point in the global scene on climate change for a decade,’ said Michael Grubb, a professor of international energy and climate policy at University College London.

The international community hopes to conclude a global climate treaty to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2015, when the United Nations will host a climate conference in Paris.

On Wednesday, Europe announced cuts of its own, as climate talks began in the U.N. aimed at stopping the global loss of valuable resources and weather catastrophes.

The latest round of U.N. climate negotiations began Wednesday, with the European Union announcing it will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 24 percent by 2020 based on 1990 levels — more than its targeted cut of 20 percent — said EU Climate Action Commissioner Connie Hedegaard.

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