Chertoff is going to make a killing from more than one new security measure being put in place at American airports.

Not only did he make money as a lobbyist in order to obtain stimulus money to be spent on possibly unsafe xray porno scans, he is also going to reap profits from a biometric verified ID system that will whisk you past long lines and undignified checks reserved for the unwashed peasants for the low price of $179.00.

He’s one of the investors that picked up the bankrupt company “Clear” at auction. This system appears to be already up and running in Orlando and is slated to open in Denver in Nov 2010. Perhaps by Thanksgiving?

Back in May 2010 the NYT reported:

The assets of Verified Identity Pass, the start-up that ran the Clear service in 18 airports in the United States and shut down about a year ago in a dispute with creditors, were acquired for $6 million in a federal bankruptcy proceeding on April 16.

The winning bidder, AlClear, is led by two former investment managers and backed in part by Robert V. LaPenta, chief executive of  L-1 Identity Solutions, a biometrics company based in Stamford, Conn., that supplied kiosks and other technology to the original Verified Identity Pass.

The new company, to be renamed Clear, will be based in New York. Mr. LaPenta and Michael Chertoff, a former secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, will sit on its board.

Back in 2005 the Electronic Privacy Information Center appeared before congress and one concern was the security, storage, and possible alternate uses of private and personal data collected by a private company which is not subject to the same restrictions as the government would be:

The private company would be in charge of verifying identity documents and maintaining a database full of personally identifiable data and images of the identity documents submitted by U.S. citizens and permanent foreign residents. The private company, unlike TSA and other federal government agencies, is not subject to the restrictions of the Privacy Act of 1974.18 When passing the Privacy Act, Congress sought to restrict amount of personal information that federal agencies could collect and required agencies to be transparent in their information practices.19 The members of the Clear Registered Traveler program would be subject to the private company’s choice of what data to collect, how and where to store the data, and who has access to the data.

More here: http://epic.org/

Resist.