More proof we probably need the Log Cabin Republicans to continue their suit against the military’s Don’t-Ask-Don’t-Tell policy, despite the showy ‘repeal’ signing ceremony at the White House month: Congressman Duncan Hunter (the son) will introduce legislation to cripple the repeal.

He’s going to introduce what SLDN’s Aubrey Sarvis called the “killer amendment,” which would add the service chiefs to the certification process. Mitch McConnell tried the same thing in December, on the after the Senate passed the repeal bill. Of course, it’s too late now. But, that’s not stopping Duncan Hunter. He’s obsessed.

And Hunter’s well-respected within his caucus on military matters:

Hunter, an Iraq and Afghanistan war veteran, is concerned that the bill passed in December repealing the “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy “excluded the service chiefs from the certification process,” said one congressional aide.

Surveying the troops — and releasing the survey results in ways that allow repeal opponents to slice-and-dice the results — was a bad idea from the very beginning. Now, those results will be used to justify pushing the required certification down a level:

Hunter’s measure would require the Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps chiefs to submit to the congressional defense committees “written certification that repeal … will not degrade the readiness, effectiveness, cohesion and morale of combat arms units and personnel of the armed force under [each] officer’s jurisdiction engaged in combat, deployed to a combat theater, or preparing for deployment to a combat theater,” according to a copy obtained by The Hill.

“The emphasis here is on combat troops,” said the aide, “because when Congress heard from the military chiefs, it was the leaders of the Army and Marine Corps who had the strongest concerns — the services that are most engaged in war right now.”

I imagine if the service chiefs went along with DADT repeal, Hunter and his warrrior allies on the Hill would simply press on, eventually making NCOs certify their individual soldiers and Marines are A-okay with Teh Ghey. A court decision backing up repeal is probably the only thing that will stop the discharges — and it’ll likely need to include an immediate halt to investigations as well as a non-discriminatory policy statement that DADT is unconstitutional.