A blog post by Sharon Ward, originally published at Third and State.

In a recent article examining the impact of Marcellus Shale drilling in Pennsylvania, The New York Times asked me to put the state’s tax policy on gas drilling in perspective. I explained that drilling isn’t producing the tax revenue needed to address the significant impacts of drilling or to support shared state priorities. Reporting from Montrose, Pa., reporter Kit Seelye writes:

The [Marcellus Shale] gas boom is transforming small towns like this one (population 4,400 and growing) and revitalizing the economy of this once-forgotten stretch of rural northeastern Pennsylvania. The few hotels here have expanded, restaurants are packed and housing rentals have more than doubled …

But the boom — brought on by an advanced drilling technique called hydraulic fracturing, known as fracking — has brought problems too. While the gas companies have created numerous high-paying drilling jobs, many residents lack the skills for them. Some people’s drinking water has been contaminated. Narrow country roads are crumbling under the weight of heavy trucks. With housing scarce and expensive, more residents are becoming homeless. Local services and infrastructure are strained.

“Very little tax revenue goes to local governments to help them share in the benefits of the economic development,” said Sharon Ward, executive director of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, an independent policy research organization.

And some are asking whether short-term gains have obscured the long-term view of an industry marked by boom-bust cycles.

Read the Full New York Times story